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Discussion on: Switch to Linux?

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fennecdjay profile image
Jérémie Astor

May I ask why?

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abhigya53544714 profile image
Abhigyan Kumar

Intro

I have been using Windows since I was born. I switched to Linux by setting up KDE Neon on my primary laptop. My laptop had two drives.

  1. 128GB SSD
  2. 1TB Hard disk

I installed Linux on my SSD for better performance. For the first month, I used Linux extensively and was impressed by its speed and low RAM usage.

Problem starts

The problem started when my SSD was full of software and packages. I literally had only 3GB left on my SSD. However, I had more than 950GB left on my hard disk. I tried to move those packages from my SSD to Hard Disk, but I failed. And that's the point I had to leave Linux and roll back to the shackles of Windows.

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pablohs1986 profile image
Pablo Herrero Author

Thanks for the advice, Abhigyan, I'll keep it in mind.

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codemouse92 profile image
Jason C. McDonald • Edited

@abhigya53544714 Ohhh, I'm following your logic regarding Linux now!

I assure you, the problem was not Linux there, but rather your drive configuration. The reason you "failed" to move those packages was because you should not be taking them out of the directories they're placed in by the package manager. Windows and Linux do not work in the same way; you cannot move packages like you can Windows executables.

There are multiple ways to fix that problem.

The quick-and-dirty way is to boot to a Live USB copy of Linux, so you're not booting to either hard drive directly. Copy one of the larger folders, probably /usr, to the HDD, and then rename the original (temporarily, in case of error) and create a symbolic link from the SSD to the HDD. Then reboot to the SSD like usual. (This solution is only a stop-gap in case you can't reinstall, however, as it's a tad brittle.)

The better, more stable way, is done at installation. Select custom drive configuration during Install, and set up the SSD as root (/), but then set up separate partitions on your HDD for /usr (where most programs get installed) and /home. Your computer will be a bit slower as a result, obvious since you're loading your programs from an HDD instead of an SSD, but it will work pretty well regardless.

Solution 3 is to get a larger SSD, but I assume that's not an option.

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abhigya53544714 profile image
Abhigyan Kumar

I agree with your solutions(I don't want to buy a new SSD), and I even implemented these all for a while. However, it became a nightmare to maintain all this.

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codemouse92 profile image
Jason C. McDonald • Edited

How was it a nightmare, precisely?

Also, had you indeed reinstalled with /usr being configured as a separate partition on the HDD? It didn't sound like you had. That isn't a "nightmare" at all; it's quite effective if done in the normal manner, and you wouldn't ever notice it (except for the speed drop).