DEV Community

loading...

Discussion on: How to not be a dinosaur.

Collapse
galdamez profile image
Jose Galdamez

I feel as if our careers parallel each other's in age, years spent in the industry, and technology stacks encountered along the way. My journey pretty much went through the same milestones at around the same time: CF to PHP to jQuery to AngularJS to React. It has been overwhelming at different points, but definitely fun to see how technologies have evolved. I'm fortunate in that I'm at a point where I can occasionally choose the front end stacks so long as the customer's problem is being solved. This allows time to dabble in new libraries even if the occasional fragmentation gets introduced. The major hurdle for me is being diligent about starting and ending online trainings. My next major thing to learn is the JAMStack and Gatsby.

Collapse
dreamdealer profile image
Johan van Tongeren Author

Thanks for the reply, Jose!

(Online) Training is also something that keeps me thinking. At MyOnlineStore each of the developers has a budget allocated for personal development. My manager often asks me how I want to use it.

My colleagues and I have subscribed to Egghead.io and we're going to visit a conference early next year, but I can't honestly think of something else I can spend that money on 🤷‍♂️

Collapse
galdamez profile image
Jose Galdamez

Believe it or not but I have subscriptions to O'Reilly Online Learning, Sitepoint Premium, Egghead, Packt Premium, Tuts+, Pluralsight, and a list of Udemy courses. It's certainly too much content for any one person to go through. Here's my breakdown for what I think of each.

Egghead: Out of all them, the one with the most up-to-date tutorials on open source libraries would be Egghead. Their tutorials tend to run a bit fast so I usually have to go through a lesson a couple of times before the concepts sink in.

Pluralsight: Pluralsight would be the most polished in terms of presentation and the top choice for industry certification—if that is the end goal. They have quizzes you can take to prove what you learned.

O'Reilly: O'Reilly is probably the largest library since it combines a long list of publishers (O'Reilly, Apress, Wrox, Packt) into one site. O'Reilly has just released an interactive learning feature which apparently allows one to get hands-on within a browser. I have yet to use it though.

Sitepoint Premium: Sitepoint produces lots of original content—books, videos, articles—for open source. Some of the video tutorials are letdowns. The books have gotten more numerous in quantity and shorter in length. Sitepoint will also aggregate books from other publishers like Packt so it's kind of a 3-for-1 deal. They are now pushing an offline reading app that is 100% Web-based. This came after they decided to move away from downloadable e-book formats. Personally, I find it kind of annoying.

Packt: Packt books are too all over the place; some are okay and some are duds. I probably have over 100 Packt e-books and am in no rush to read any of them. Most of the authors do not seem to be well known.

Tuts+: Tuts+ has a lot of information for both popular and obscure open source libraries. You'll also find more UX and design-focused content here than most of the other platforms.

Udemy: Some top, work-from-home teachers can certainly be found here. I find most of the courses are catered towards beginners and can be rather long-winded. It's the cheapest if all you need is a couple of courses throughout the year. The lowest price is $9.99 a course.

Free ones: You want to know what's the crazy part? Chances are most developers don't have to pay for online tutorials. My public library provides free access to LinkedIn Learning (formerly Lynda.com) in addition to a few other IT training sites. That's not even counting the other free resources on YouTube, Microsoft's Website, freeCodeCamp, Medium, Dev.to, and Adobe TV.

Bottom line: The biggest challenge for me is winnowing down to the sites that make the most sense for the skills I'm trying to learn.

My recommendation: For the front-end space, I doubt anything beats Egghead. My 2nd top choice for training, in general, would be Pluralsight.

Thread Thread
dreamdealer profile image
Johan van Tongeren Author

Thanks for the extensive reply, Jose! 😇

Pluralsight is new for me and I've immediately opened the site and I'm going to look into it right away. Certification is a nice bonus 🙃

Thread Thread
galdamez profile image
Jose Galdamez

My pleasure! I would only add that Pluralsight seems to only offer the certification practice exams for CCNA, CISSP, VmWare, Azure Admin, PMP, etc. if a user is on the business plan, not the individual plan. That could be a good motivation to have your employer sponsor a monthly or annual subscription. Either way, have fun learning! We got this 🧠👍