re: Gradians and Turns: the quiet heroes of CSS angles VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

If you’re gonna specify 30° (1/3 of a right angle, i.e. 1/12 of a full angle), you don’t need 30deg nor 0.0833turn – nor do you need 33.333grad. You might want to use calc(1/12 * 1turn) – probably the easiest to read notation.

 

Definitely a solid option. I personally would have a hard time visualizing how much of a turn that is, since I'm super not used to thinking in twelfths, but if you like it, roll with it!

That's the big takeaway that I hope people get from this article: adding turns and grads into the mix gives us way more flexibility in finding the most personally useful way to express our angles. Use the one that makes the most sense to you and your team!

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