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re: How to fail a programming interview VIEW POST

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My current position did not have a "technical" interview. The CTO and Manager interviewed me personally and we just talked. At the end of the day are you hiring someone based on how they code right now in a bubble or the ability to learn and be part of a great team? I'm not saying they had the right way or wrong way, but it set an expectation of trust and collaboration from the get go. Idk food for thought perhaps. Great post by the way.

 

I think that can totally work, but it's also true that some people are much better at talking the talk than walking the walk. Having a session where you can spend an hour or so working with someone to see how they organize their thoughts and solve problems can be quite illuminating. If a person you're considering hiring already has a decent amount of experience, and maybe they can point to a body of code that they've written, it may be less crucial to actually do a coding interview, and just a get-to-know-you session is good enough.

 

This is why I place a lot of value in the feedback during the interview. While it's important that they come up with a working solution, it's their behaviour that determines whether that will happen.

I will often have people who could not solve the problem on their own, but by listening to their thoughts and reading their code, I can guide them towards a working solution. This fulfills the requirements I think you want: can this person learn and grow.

 
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