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re: Top 3 Things to Drop From Resumes - Discuss Additional! VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

Interviewer for large company IT department based in the US.

Address for where candidates live has brought up the topic of commute and my companies lack of a work from home policy which may not have been mentioned otherwise, for what it's worth.
Also I wouldn't leave experience off but list it as bullet points with company, role, and dates. If you're jumping jobs so frequently that bullet points add another page to your resume, as an interviewer I'd want to discuss that. Why did you leave so frequently? If you were displeased, what were your struggles?

 

This is definitely one of those cultural things even in the US. For example, many in SF area, Seattle, Portland, and other areas assume that a competent and capable engineer will have multiple jobs and many projects on their resume. If not, why did they stay put at one position so long? Have they not learned new skills and are they not curious?

This has been a huge problem for some going between the big company like Microsoft and wanting to get into startups. Startups routinely skip out on long serving MS employees solely because of concern around them having learned - or not learned - and being adaptable to doing many things.

It boils down to how one needs to present themselves to one or the other related to what they'd want to do. If they want to work in a company and stay there for many years, they need to cater the resume specifically to them being stable and consistent at a singular job. If they want to work for startups that will require one to wear many hats they'd need to show how they can at whim tackle a wide range of jobs and projects.

This one I've fought with for years myself. It's an interesting battle! :)

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