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Discussion on: The full-stack dilemma

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jwp profile image
John Peters

In IT, everything is ultimately market driven. There are just two aspects 1) What the customer wants, and when. 2) How much profit is to be made.

Those that can do the work for the lowest price and highest quality drive the winning model.

We are in global competition. For example I heard once that the top 10% of the best programmers in India represent more people than the entire U.S. programmer population. So that means that the models are set by the largest and best programming teams worldwide. Marketing hype aside, the word gets out on the best models for today.

What's interesting is that with respect to Compositional front and back end techniques, we as programmers should be assembly line workers putting parts together. This means that we should be able to assemble anything anywhere.
Specializations are still needed but focus should be on parts development for the majority of the work to be done. Until this concept is the norm, we'll be continuing to reinvent every wheel required ad nauseum.
Opinion matters much less than perceived need. Those needs are rooted in the current trend of the year. One thing is certain, if we steer our career in the right way following the trends, we will maximize our goals, halfstack or full stack.

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Matti Bar-Zeev Author

we as programmers should be assembly line workers putting parts together. This means that we should be able to assemble anything anywhere.

Nope. Sorry. I can't regard "Programming" as assembly line work, though I sadly agree that in many companies that is the case.

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John Peters

That's proof to me that the concepts of WebComponents has never taken off. We use all of these super duper frameworks (for front-end) and few are creating reusable libraries. I've been in IT for a long time and this lack of reusable components is a common theme. It's programming as it was 20 years ago.

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Matti Bar-Zeev Author

I think it was uncle Bob who said that every 5 years the developers number is multiplied. That means that every 5 years you get 50% of the developers with less than 5 years of experience. They are bound to repeat the mistakes done before.