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Discussion on: How To Take Notes on Everything

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murkrage profile image
Mike Ekkel

This is incredibly useful. I'm definitely going to try and implement this in my workflow. I've started using Notion 2 weeks ago and it's been a blast taking notes. I particularly like your "Take notes on" list. Too many times I've found myself thinking: this is a great article with some great insights, I should take notes. But I never did, usually because the article disappeared into procrastination oblivion.

I'm wondering what your study notebook looks like. How do you organise your notes and keep track of everything?

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maxwell_dev profile image
Max Antonucci Author • Edited

I included a link to my notebook near the top, but admittedly it wasn't clearly labeled so I added a bit to the link now. Here it is again for quicker access - max-antonucci.gitbook.io/study-not....

I usually organize them more by category than a specific medium or source. I have a section on JavaScript, and each note is a specific topic like arrays or switch statements and whatnot. Some notes have only one reference, and some have multiple. I've found grouping by category makes it easier to compile info on the same topic from different sources, and gives me more flexibility in how I organize it all.

The one exception I've made lately is with books that are long and don't fall into any other topic too neatly. In that case I'll give them a section all on their own. It's what I did recently with "Pragmatic Thinking and Learning" and the first part of "Clean Code." Each book is their own section of the notebook, and each chapter or part of that book is its own note.

Looking back now, I may refactor some of the other books I've taken notes on into the same setup. "Accessibility for Everyone" has enough content that I should probably split it into a few notes.