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Discussion on: Git - Command line vs GUIs

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Nicolai Parlog

FWIW I started out with SourceTree, which I enjoyed a lot and let me get to know Git in a surrounding I was familiar with (meaning GUI). After switching to Linux and being at a loss of a good GUI client, I went to the command line. That was much easier than expected, because I already knew what I wanted to do, so I only had to learn one new thing (commands) instead of two (commands and Git).

It often pays off to sooner or later go down to the bare metal, especially for tools you use a lot. But I disagree with the general idea that this is always better for everyone. Getting started on a high level of abstraction and moving your way down the stack over time and when needed is a valid approach IMHO. (Same can be said for IDEs, for example.)

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Tommy Hodgins

FWIW I started out with SourceTree, which I enjoyed a lot and let me get to know Git in a surrounding I was familiar with (meaning GUI). After switching to Linux and being at a loss of a good GUI client, I went to the command line.

I came here to say the same thing :D

For me I always felt (and still feel about Github) like I'm never quite sure what I'm about to do, but at the same time that also applies to my ability to un-do anything the GUI does by accident.

I thought Git was hard until I used it on the command-line, since then it's the only thing I use for Git. The text-based interface is very flexible, and since working with it goes a little slower (you have to enter commands individually) it seems to reduce errors and make solving errors that happen easier. With a GUI for Git it's too easy to do 5 or 10 wrong things at once :/