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Discussion on: Replacing master with main in Github

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ragar90 profile image
René Alfredo García Hernández • Edited

I'm a "person of color" and i honestly never felt bad about the terminology, if you feel bad about a term then do the change in your own projects but do not enforcing this kind of things into others just because we use a term does not mean we are pro racism or white supremacy.

Also you have to remember that the developer community extends outside the US and there a lot of other people in other countries that do not feel that way, i understand the police brutally black people suffer in the US is horrible and a change has to be made but that change will not come from changing a term that it has nothing to do with and it has a complete different semantic

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afrodevgirl profile image
Alexis Moody Author

While all people of color face oppression, the term "master" in relation to the black experience in America is an isolated case. I don't expect other people of color to have the same visceral reaction I do. I've never, and would never, accused anyone for being racist for using the term in the context of Git.

I'm not an all powerful developer that can force people to change their use of antiquated terminology. But what I can, and will, do is help people that want to make the change do just that. Especially because the term "master" doesn't accurately describe what that branch is doing.

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ragar90 profile image
René Alfredo García Hernández

That's ok if you do not feel comfortable with the term then you are free to use your naming conventions you prefer i do not have any problem with that.

How ever this entire discussion about the "master", "blacklist/whitelist" is more like "progressive" propaganda and there is some groups of people that just because you don't buy their agenda they immediately label you as the oppressor and the root of all evil and that is simply stupid because you will not fix the original problem (which btw still does not have anything to do with the industry conventions) you end up dehumanizing everyone that does not agree with your point and in some cases it even radicalized them to the other extreme, i beleive is time to stop the PC nonsense and be more tolerant to each other

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maxart2501 profile image
Massimo Artizzu

While I think some of the characteristics of the current BLM movement are over the line and not really beneficial to the cause, I find also quite superficial to dismiss them as "progressive propaganda", "nonsense" and "stupid". Isn't that dehumanizing?

It's easy to think that everything that doesn't directly resonate with our life is meaningless, but with time I tried to assume that it's more a fault of my limited perspective. I.e., I think people do feel bad for reading some terms if they just say so and if I have no evidence of the opposite. It's called trust in other people's honesty, and it's something I'd like to be applied to me too if there will be the chance.

And I may be out of American politics, but it's interesting how "progressive" is seen as a bad thing. Shouldn't we all like progress? 🤔

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darkwiiplayer profile image
DarkWiiPlayer

I think it's not only a question of whether people feel a certain way about reading a word, but also about how valid that emotional response is to society. If someone has personal experiences that make them particularly dislike a certain word, telling them "no you don't" is just plain ignorant, but that doesn't mean there can't or shouldn't be a compromise.

I'm not fundamentally against changing a word just because a small minority finds it offensive, but everyone can find anything offensive and it is ultimately up to the society whether it's a reasonable response or over the top.

The only metric I can apply to judge this is how I'd feel about something like this, and I'm just not the type of person to care about words either way, so neither can I relate, nor do I personally think there's any real problem to begin with.

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9tailsdattebayo profile image
Rasengan • Edited

We are the same. I had such a hard time understanding this specific issue. I'm neither white nor black. Coming from a 3rd world country we had different kinds of issues there. Coming to America, this issue wasn't something I really didn't pay attention.

So it was very hard for me to empathize on weight of words. Nor defunding police is something I've seen first hand the consequences of underpaid police.

I was called a racist for not empathizing to the cause. oh well. 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️🤷‍♂️

The issue with America, is putting too much labels on things. I envision a world, where you get labelled by your name and not skin color or heritage. if thats too hard. maybe ID #s

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darkwiiplayer profile image
DarkWiiPlayer

I'm from Germany and I've always found it weird how much emphasis North-Americans put on words. You can also see it a lot with "swearwords"; where in Germany we don't mind saying a word in a sentence like "You shouldn't use X" or "The word X has many negative connotations", in America there seems to be no separation between that and actually using the word itself.

But I also think that, in general, Europe has a much stronger cultural tendency to value intention over vocabulary.