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Discussion on: Why Older People Struggle In Programming Jobs

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stereoplegic profile image
Mike Bybee

While I've been in the startup game for over 5 years now (as "employee #1," co-founder, etc., not random growth hire), I'm really diving in lately. As I binge the Startups For the Rest of Us podcast, host Rob Walling (ex Drip, current TinySeed) keeps referring to himself with a term that resonates with me more and more: "Unemployable," for all of the reasons you mention, especially the politicking, doublespeak, and knowing my worth.

My last go at a hiring process lasted a month and a half, went from hiring for one department to another, several interviews (several repeated due to the switch of departments), and finally an attempt to negotiate conversion salary down (this was your typical staffing firm CTH scenario, with a just as typical crappy client, because I usually just don't have the time to apply directly) before waiting another several days to extend a formal offer, then a "HURRY UP" when I had an emergency to deal with while waiting on them. I told them to go F themselves (really) and doubled down on my startup and partnerships.

Unemployable indeed.

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Adam Nathaniel Davis Author

This definitely wins the award for Comment That Made Me Think The Most Today. (Don't you feel honored??)

The "unemployable" thing gnaws at me. On one hand, I think I enjoy the pure act of coding now more than I ever have. And I know that my overall coding prowess is stronger than it's ever been.

On the other hand, it feels to me like some of that ancillary political stuff keeps getting amplified in my gigs. To the point where some might say that I'm "unemployable" - even though I can code now better than I ever have.

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Mike Bybee

I've come to realize this about myself: I'm far less averse to the risks inherent in early stage startups than I am to the BS which has inherent potential in all companies, but which only grows exponentially with company size.