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re: Publisher Denied My Game Because of Custom C++ Engine VIEW POST

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re: Custom game engines are a turn off to a lot of publishers because of a simple reason: broadening the target market is way more expensive. Publishe...
 

This is exactly what I was going for, I did do an extremely poor job of explaining the various risks and "why it made sense" from the business standpoint, something I have since learned and hope future articles will include the why a little bit better. Well explained, though I disagree about the final comment that creating a engine should be done only to create an engine... Doing so definitely adds time, is more risky and has potential impact on partnerships - which is what I was trying to share.

 

Probably poorly worded. I did not mean to imply that you should only create a game engine when your only result would be the game engine, and not a game. You should only create a game engine, when you actually want to create an engine, and not "just" a game. Note sure if that makes it any more clear :)

10+ years ago you did not have a lot of choice when you wanted to create a game, and did not have a lot of money to buy an full fledged game engine. But these days there are really good F(L)OSS and cheap game engines to get you started in game development.

So unless you want to take the hurdles, and experience what it takes to create a game engine, you probably want to get something off the shelf.
But if you want to take the challenge, I recommend to use SDL as much as possible as it takes care of a lot of mundane and finicky low-level platform parts. That way you can focus on the engine technology, and not crack your head on trying to process input from keyboards or controllers (for example).

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