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Analyzing Wood Burning Stoves with FLaNK Stack: MiNiFi, Flink, NiFi, Kafka, Kudu

tspannhw profile image Timothy Spann Originally published at datainmotion.dev on ・4 min read

Analyzing Wood Burning Stoves with FLaNK Stack: MiNiFi, Flink, NiFi, Kafka, Kudu (FLaNK Stack)

Winter has arrived, finally. The 50-70 F days are over, it dropped below 30 F in Princeton, so time to light up the wood burning stove and burn some season cherry wood (We get cherry wood from a local tree service that removes dead trees for people and then season the wood. Recycle!) . It's great for camp fires, smoking meats and for heating up our house. Also if you have no smelled cherry wood smoke it is amazing. I wanted to see if having a fire that raised my houses temperature from 67 F to 87 F would produce noticeable sensor readings. Fortunately, I have a thermal camera sensor (Pimoroni rocks! Add another thing to my list of thinks I love from Britain (Dr. Who, Jelly Babies, Pimoroni and my awesome boss Dan). I also have Raspberry Pi sensors for temperature, humidity, light and various gas sensors. Let's see what the numbers look like. The temperatures and images start greeen and yellow and as they heat up turn red, purple and then pure white. That's real hot. Fortunately the Raspberry Pis didn't overheat, had to open a window when we got close to 90. Yes, temperature regulation and maybe an automated wood feeder would be nice.

Inside the Stove

Cherry Wood burning nice in stove, notice Fire on Cloudera T-Shirt

Four USB PS3 Eye Cameras ($7!!!) attached to Raspberry Pi 3B+ and 4s.

A very organized professional assortment of Pis and sensors...

** It's very easy to spot check my sensor values as they stream through Apache Kafka with Cloudera SMM.**

Some Sensor Readings:

{"bme280_tempf": " 93.78", "uuid": "20200117195629_104c9f2a-b5a8-43d2-8386-57b7bd05f55a", "systemtime": "01/17/2020 14:56:29", "bme280_altitude": "-41.31", "memory": 92.1, " max30105_value": "84.00", "end": "1579290989.4628081", "imgnamep": "images/bog_image_p_20200117195629_104c9f2a-b5a8-43d2-8386-57b7bd05f55a.jpg", "max30105_temp": " 34.56", "ipaddress": "192.168.1.251", "diskusage": "44726.6", "host": "garden2", "max30105timestamp": "20200117-145629-345697", "starttime": "01/17/2020 13:48:29", "bme280_altitude_feet": "-135.53", "max30105_delta": "0.00", "max30105_mean": "84.00", "max30105_detected": "False", "bme280_tempc": " 34.32", "bme280_pressure": " 1034.61", "cputemp": 59, "te": "4079.87322807312", "imgname": "images/bog_image_20200117195629_104c9f2a-b5a8-43d2-8386-57b7bd05f55a.jpg"}

[{"uuid":"sgp30_uuid_xyg_20200117185015","ipaddress":"192.168.1.221","runtime":"0","host":"garden3","host_name":"garden3","macaddress":"dc:a6:32:32:98:20","end":"1579287015.6653564","te":"0.025962352752685547","systemtime":"01/17/2020 13:50:15","cpu":55.0,"diskusage":"109290.8 MB","memory":29.7,"equivalentco2ppm":" 400","totalvocppb":" 37","id":"20200117185015_b8fbd9c1-fa30-4f70-b20d-e43a2c703b18"}]

{"uuid": "rpi4_uuid_kse_20200117222947", "ipaddress": "192.168.1.243", "host": "rp4", "host_name": "rp4", "macaddress": "dc:a6:32:03:a6:e9", "systemtime": "01/17/2020 17:29:47", "cpu": 50.8, "diskusage": "46208.0 MB", "memory": 18.2, "id": "20200117222947_e9299089-d56f-468b-8bac-897a2918307a", "temperature": " 48.96355155197982", "pressure": " 1035.4460084255888", "humidity": " 0.0", "lux": " 49.0753", "proximity": "0", "gas": "Oxidising: 30516.85 Ohms\nReducing: 194406.50 Ohms\nNH3: 104000.00 Ohms"}

{"host": "rp4", "cputemp": "72", "ipaddress": "192.168.1.243", "endtime": "1579293634.02", "runtime": "0.00", "systemtime": "01/17/2020 15:40:34", "starttime": "01/17/2020 15:40:34", "diskfree": "46322.7", "memory": "17.1", "uuid": "20200117204034_99f49e71-7444-4fd7-b82e-7e03720c4c39", "image_filename": "20200117204034_d9f811a3-8582-4b47-b4b4-cb6ec51cca04.jpg"}

The next step is to have NiFi load the data to Kudu, Hive, HBase or Phoenix tables for analysis with Cloudera Data Science Work Bench and some machine learning analytics in Python 3 on either Zeppelin or Jupyter notebooks feeding CDSW. Then I can host my final model on K8 within CDSW for a real edge to AI application and solve the issue of how much fire in my house is too much?

This article is part of the FLaNK Stack series, highlighting using the FL (ink) A pache N iFi K afka Kudu stack for big data streaming development with IoT and AI applications.

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Timothy Spann

@tspannhw

I am a Principal Field Engineer for Data in Motion at Cloudera. I work with Apache NiFi, Apache Kafka, Apache Spark, Apache Flink, IoT, MXNet, DLJ.AI, Deep Learning, Machine Learning, Streaming...

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