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Quick Tip – How to find the difference between two numbers

10xlearner profile image 10x learner Originally published at 10xlearner.com on ・3 min read

Hello ! I’m Xavier Jouvenot and in this small post, I am going to explain how to find the difference between two numbers.

Self promotion: You can find other articles on Android development on my website 😉

Subtracting number isn’t enough ?

First, let’s defines precisely what a difference is and why a subtraction isn’t enough.

The difference between two numbers is the absolute delta between them.

To calculate this absolute delta, you have to subtract the smaller number from the larger one.Indeed, if you subtract the larger one from the smaller one, you won’t find the right answer.

Let’s take an example:

3 - 1 = 2
1 - 3 = -2
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Here you can see the only when subtracting the smaller number, 1, from the larger one, 3, we obtain the right result 2. 🙂

We can notice, when we inverse the minimum and the maximum, that the result is the opposite number of the absolute delta.

Solution implementation

Here is a naive implementation for the difference:

template<class T, std::enable_if_t<std::is_arithmetic_v<T>>...>
auto difference(const T& x, const T& y) noexcept
{
    return std:abs(x - y);
}
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There are several points that I am going to explain in this solution.

First, let’s talk about std::abs.As I mentioned in the previous part, when you invert the term of the subtraction to get the difference, you get the opposite number of the absolute delta that we want.Which means that the absolute value of this result is in fact the result that we want.

So using std::abs, no matter the min and the max of the parameters, we will always have our absolute delta returned as a result.

Of course, we could have used std::min or std::max, but the implementation is much clearer with std::abs.Moreover, we are going to talk about std::min and std::max in the next part. 😉

Constexpr solution

In the previous part, we have implemented a version of the difference non-constexpr when, actually, we can implement one which is.And the more constexpr things there are, the more happy I am (if you not convince about the utility of constexpr, I encourage you to look at the talk “constexpr ALL the Things!”, by Ben Deane and Jason Turner).

Here is some implementations that we could think about, by using std::min and std::max, since both are constexpr functions:

template<class T, std::enable_if_t<std::is_arithmetic_v<T>>...>
constexpr auto differenceUsingMin(const T& x, const T& y) noexcept
{
    return (std::min(x, y) == x) ? (y - x) : (x - y);
}

template<class T, std::enable_if_t<std::is_arithmetic_v<T>>...>
constexpr auto differenceUsingMax(const T& x, const T& y) noexcept
{
    return (std::max(x, y) == y) ? (y - x) : (x - y);
}
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Why not use std::min and std::max, but not std::abs here, you may wonder ? 🤔
Well, currently, std::abs is not a constexpr function which make it impossible to use it in this context.So I ask the community on Reddit, and for now, nobody was able to tell me why std::abs isn’t a constexpr function when it could be.

Here is an implementation possible:

template<class T, std::enable_if_t<std::is_arithmetic_v<T>>...>
constexpr auto my_abs(const T& x) noexcept
{
    return x < 0 ? -x : x;
}

template<class T, std::enable_if_t<std::is_arithmetic_v<T>>...>
constexpr auto difference(const T& x, const T& y) noexcept
{
    return my_abs(x - y);
}
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As you can see, this solution is far more readable than the one using std::min and std::max.I hope that we will soon have a constexpr implementation of std::abs 🙂


Thank you all for reading this article,And until my next article, have a splendid day 😉

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