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Discussion on: Au Revoir, Gentoo - Sell Me A New Linux Distro

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davidboh profile image
David Boh

Do you think Arch is the same as Gentoo? I'm realatively new to the Linux world, but I'm loving it so far. Started with Ubuntu, now I use Fedora as my daily driver.

I always saw Gentoo and Arch as excellent distros to learn, but not to be used as daily drivers considering they can affect your productivity. Some people seem to disagree.

I have been using Linux for six months, I jumped from Ubuntu to Debian, and from Debian to Fedora, and I know I don't have enough experience but I can tell you I have no complaints about Fedora whatsoever, it works beautifully for me, at least it has worked perfectly for me so far. I chose it because I saw excellent opinions about the distro online, and I love how most software is updated. I really love how Debian looks and feels, and the stability, but i think that stability has a cost, which is outdated software.

I have tried Manjaro and I think those guys made an excellent job with it. I would suggest you choose between Fedora and Manjaro. They are updated and fairly stable. Imo they have that nice balance between updated software and stability. Also, you don't have to babysit your OS that much.

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deciduously profile image
Ben Lovy Author

Do you think Arch is the same as Gentoo?

No, but they're similar in a lot of important ways. I generally prefer Gentoo to Arch, it's a little more "just Linux" whereas Arch has some idiosyncrasies.

they can affect your productivity.

They definitely can, but in general it's still a choice. I've been using Gentoo to do work for years and years, and only getting in the weeds with OS configuration when I want to. However, it's always tempting, and it is possible to screw up your box pretty easily if you're not careful and don't do your research, which is absolutely a productivity drain

outdated software

From my understanding, Debian ships with a bunch of outdated (but highly tested) software, but still gives you the ability to pick and choose some software to keep closer to upstream. That seems like the best of both worlds to me, what remains to be seen is how easy it actually is to manage on a per-package basis. Most of my software, I don't care if it's years out of date as long as it works reliably.

Thanks for your take!

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David Boh

I gave up on Debian because I felt I was too "noob" to use it, but perhaps I'll go back to it when I feel I'm more experienced with Linux. I really like the Debian Project in general.

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Ben Lovy Author • Edited

Totally. That's a huge barrier, and I had a similar experience when I was getting started. I think Ubuntu addresses that need well. However, I now do have enough familiarity to overcome pretty much anything it throws at me - the basic setup I needed to do to get graphics and WiFi running on Debian Buster took me about ten minutes yesterday, which is acceptable especially because I probably won't ever need to touch it again, even though Ubuntu would have likely done it for me out of the box. It was only that fast because I've been down that road before many times, though, and I remember wasting hours my first time around.

I really like the Debian Project too, and would rather use their OS than Ubuntu's if it doesn't get too much in my way.