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Cover image for Creating a minute with 100 "seconds"

Creating a minute with 100 "seconds"

gmelodie profile image Gabriel Cruz (he/him) ・1 min read

Counting to 60 is lame.

No, really, think about it. We (humans) generally use base 10 to general counting tasks, because we have 10 fingers on our hands. So I'd expect that our time system would go from 1 to 10 or from 1 to 100. But no, we count from 1 to 60...

Wanna know what's even more disturbing? This time system is not even consistent. Sometimes we count to 60 (60 seconds is a minute and 60 minutes is an hour), but sometimes we count to 100 (like milliseconds, microseconds, etc.)! That's just outrageous.

As programmers, it's our job to fix the World's nastiest issues, such as this dirty little time counting system.

Now imagine a day had 100 hours, an hour had 100 minutes, and a minute had 100 seconds. Wouldn't that be great? Introducing cclock.

GitHub logo gmelodie / cclock

CLI clock that divides time in 100, not 60


Cclock is a basic conversion tool that will convert hours, minutes and seconds to CTime, a time system that actually makes sense:
$ cclock 1 49 30
Normal Time:    1h  49min   50s
CTime:          1ch 83ct    6cs

Cclock, or centhclock, has three basic time measures: centhconds (cs), centhutes (ct) and centhours (ch), where

1ch = 100ct
1ct = 100cs
1ch = 1h

Here's a conversion table with more detailed conversions

Time measure Centhconds Centhutes Centhours
1 Second 2.777778 cs 0.02777778 ct 0.0002777778 ch
1 Minute 166.66668 cs 1.6666668 ct 0.016666668 ch
1 Hour 10000.0008 cs 100.000008 ct 1.00000008 ch
1 Day 240000.01920 cs 2400.0001920 ct 24.000001920 ch

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gmelodie profile

Gabriel Cruz (he/him)

@gmelodie

Hey there! I'm Gabriel. I'm into Security, Open Source, Python, Go and diversifying the software engineering culture!

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