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Cover image for Mood Tracking in Remote Teams

Mood Tracking in Remote Teams

greimela profile image Andreas Greimel ・2 min read

Welcome to the largest Work From Home experiment in history!

Due to the current situation, many teams across the world suddenly have to work remotely, with all its pros and cons.

One of the major issues of decentralized teams is the loss of implicit, non-verbal communication that we as humans rely on when dealing with other people. Communication has to be initialized specifically and happens through restricted channels like phone calls or video conferences.

This way team members, scrum masters and team leaders are not able to "feel" the mood of the team anymore.

Introducing SmileyReport

SmileyReport allows teams to anonymously track the mood of its members in an easy and frictionless way.

Just create a free SmileyReport for you and your team.

Once per day or week, your team members will receive an email asking for their current mood by clicking one of these smileys. Comments are possible too!

The SmileyReport voting page

Each vote is then stored anonymously and aggregated into a daily average and its variance. Now every team member is able to see the mood of the team over time!

The SmileyReport report page, showing a graph with the average mood per day

SmileyReport is developed at TNG Technology Consulting and regularly used in different agile software development teams.

What's in it for you?

Under normal circumstances, a SmileyReport can be a powerful tool for retrospectives.

Especially if the team mood changes over time - regardless whether it is positive or negative - and can be correlated with process changes.

In the current situation, where many colleagues are working from home for the first time, an anonymous channel such as the SmileyReport can be a valuable tool for team leaders to help colleagues to find their place in this new environment.

Stay healthy, wash your hands, and happy voting!

Cover image photo by Roberto Nickson on Unsplash

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