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Discussion on: Which editor/IDE do you use and why?

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mohamed3on profile image
Mohamed Oun

I mostly use JetBrains IDEs, they're absolutely amazing and provide everything you can ask for, and I'm taking advantage of the free version for students too which is nice. I think I'll switch to the community editions once I graduate, or hopefully I'd find a good free alternative. I just don't like text editors, they feel too barebones.

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern Author

Do you routinely switch between different JetBrains IDEs with different languages/environments or do you typically work with one most of the time?

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mohamed3on profile image
Mohamed Oun

Yeah. I use PyCharm for Python, IntelliJ for Java and WebStorm for Javascript. They're all very neat.

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Chris Pouliot

I use IntelliJ Ultimate and it comes with all the language support from the other JetBrains IDEs. It's great since I never have to switch editors.

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Paul-Louis Pröve

JetBrains builds awesome IDEs. I'm just totally confused when it comes to their seperation of IDEs. I'd say there isn't a single person on this planet that can fully explain the difference of all their IDEs.

Why not just build a single modular one?

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Riley Guerin

There are differences. Important ones.

When I'm developing a rails app, I need Rake tasks but not Maven.

It is possible to do everything within Ultimate but if you're really diving into something like Rails and there is RubyMine, I recommend using RM.

Gogland has been much better for Go dev than IntelliJ. It just feels more natural. E.g The first option in lists like New file... is relevant to Go not Java.

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Robert Hencke

They do build a singular, modular one, that is effectively the union of all their other language-specific IDEs - IntelliJ IDEA Ultimate.

The difference between their IDEs (other than branding) really just boils down to "Which plug-ins am I getting with this version?". Try opening a few of their IDEs, and go to the plug-ins section of the settings, and compare what comes pre-installed.

In many ways, this really isn't so different from the Eclipse model, where Eclipse offers you an "Eclipse IDE for Java EE Developers", an "Eclipse IDE for C/C++ Developers", etc. As with Eclipse, the difference is just which plug-ins you're getting out of the box.