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Tips For Validating HTML Form Inputs

Nedy Udombat on August 14, 2019

Form Validation is something we all have to do on daily basis on the frontend because we want to improve user experience. I will explain some sim...
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lawrencejohnson profile image
Lawrence

None of these things actually protect the back end.

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nedyudombat profile image
Nedy Udombat Author

I do not entirely agree, because if the data does not pass the client-side validation, it won't even get to the server-side(backend) validation. So technically it does.

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vlasales profile image
Vlastimil Pospichal

User can bypass client-side validation.

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nedyudombat profile image
Nedy Udombat Author

True, but still it does not take the away the importance and essence of client-side validation. The point of the article is to share tips of how to validate on the client side with html, it doesn't disregard the server-side validation.

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d__raptis profile image
Jim Raptis

The client side validation enhance the user experience of the end user, too. About security, the backend should be the final layer and have its own validation.
So both of them are important🎉

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nedyudombat profile image
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lawrencejohnson profile image
Lawrence

Use Ajax for your forms and you can put all of your validation on the back end so it's all in one place. This makes it much easier to test. Some simple JavaScript and css can handle output of messaging. That said, my point was only to draw attention to the fact that these frontend shortcuts offer no security or protection for the back end. Handy for traditional form post methods, but ultimately pointless for more advanced solutions.

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nedyudombat profile image
Nedy Udombat Author

Pointless? not really. This has nothing to do with testing this is just basically using HTML to validate the data that is been gotten from a user.
It is not a frontend shortcut, because this does not stop you from performing any server-side validation but rather helps for better validation while delivering good user experiences.

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baukereg profile image
Bauke Regnerus

Sending a backend request for every form field is overload. Yes, the backend is the final layer of security, but that doesn't make frontend validation pointless.

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lawrencejohnson profile image
Lawrence

I wouldn't bother sending an AJAX request on every field either, but it depends on the complexity of the form and how it was designed. In most real world examples, if you care about data integrity, HTML5 validation is a giant pain for testing since you need to edit the markup to disable it. If you are doing unit testing, could skip manual testing without the client-side validation, but most websites are not configured for unit testing and just as many devs have no idea what that even is.

Personally, I like to do a combination of light client-side and full server-side validation. Javascript will do things like highlight an empty field that is required on blur, but ultimately all validation and messaging is handled in AJAX requests on submit. Again, it depends on the form, but in 20+ years and hundreds of form implementations, I've completely discarded use of HTML5 validation. I was on board when it first came out years ago, but dropped it within a year of applied use. Once you start working with WAS or understand how malicious users attack form handlers, you'll realize that the convenience is not that convenient.

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nedyudombat profile image
Nedy Udombat Author

Great, I think I understand you better now, but this sounds more of a matter preference.

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lawrencejohnson profile image
Lawrence

There is almost always a matter of preference involved in how you approach technology problems; my only goal from the original comment was to point out to unsuspecting visitors that HTML5 validation, by itself, will not prevent abuse.

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nedyudombat profile image
Nedy Udombat Author

True, and the essence of this article was to show tips on how to use HTML to validate the type of data being sent to the server.

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devhammed profile image
Hammed Oyedele

In case of unit testing, you can easily add novalidate attribute to the form element to bypass browser validation.

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lawrencejohnson profile image
Lawrence

I admit, I didn't know that. @nedy I think a brief note about the novalidate property would be a good addition to your article. Preferences aside, it's a great explanation of html5 validation.

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nedyudombat profile image
Nedy Udombat Author

Thank you @lawrencejohnson . I'll be sure to add that.

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monfernape profile image
Usman Khalil

I'd love to hear explanation.

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denislapi profile image
Denis Lapi

I see this as useful!

I completely agree final validation shouldn't be done on the client because it can be bypassed. But this kind of validation can reduce the number of "not valid" requests to the server. It is good to have one more layer of security in your applications.

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nedyudombat profile image
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Matteo Rigon

Hello Nedy, nice article! I'm sure people that are just getting into html5 features will find it extremely useful!

However, i'd like to point out a misconception on your very first sentence "Form Validation is something we all have to do on daily basis on the frontend because we want to ensure the validity of the data sent to the backend." as i think it may mislead newcomers.

As others have said, you absolutely cannot enforce validation on something the user owns ( browser in this case ), because there are plenty of ways of getting around: disable javascript, edit inputs with devtools, make raw post requests ( if these methods sound too technical for a normal user, think about a simple javascript error on a legacy browser you didn't even need to support ).

Security and validity should always be enforced by something the user has no access to: the server.
So why even bother validating user input on the frontend?
The answer is user experience.
If you run on the client the same checks that the server runs, in 99% of the cases you will catch errors before the request is sent, or better, before the user even finishes typing. This way, you will reach the number one goal for the user: to not waste time!

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Nedy Udombat Author

Thank you @matteorigon , reading back now, I see the perspective of which this would sound to a newcomer. The essence of this is to improve user experience and also reduce the amount of calls made to server in order to validate the data sent.

Like I also replied in other comments, I did not write this to take away the essence and important of server-side security and validation.

That said, I will update this to clearly reflect my thoughts.

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nwamugo profile image
UGOJI Duziem

Interesting ways of maximizing the capabilities of HTML5. Thank you for this article.
Front-end validation enhances the user experience. And a great user experience means a higher usage.
Front-end validation does not however secure the application. For security, validation must be done on the server-side as well.

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Nedy Udombat Author

True, the essence here was not to get rid of the server-side validation but to show you ways that HTML can help validate on the client-side.

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David Adigwu

Best way is validating from back end

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mnrode profile image
mnrode

You definitely have to validate in the backend for data consistency and security, because frontend validation can be disabled, but having validation in the frontend can significantly improve the user experience.

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Nedy Udombat Author

Thank you @mnrode for clarifying that

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nedyudombat profile image
Nedy Udombat Author

You actually have to validate both ways. That way you catch most of it on the frontend and leave the rare /edge cases to be handled by the backend.

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stealthmusic profile image
Jan Wedel

I think the type field is very important to allow the browser to also enter cached autocompletion data as well as allow accessibility.
However I would advise against using custom regular expressions und pattern field.
E.g. the password should just be very long, it doesn’t need a lot of special characters. This is just frustrating for the user. Same goes for phone numbers, I’ve seen so many form fields where I couldn’t enter a standard compliant phone number that just drives me crazy. Especially when the form just says it’s invalid but not why.

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Nedy Udombat Author

Thank you @stealthmusic . The regular expressions in the article are just for the purpose of explaining what the pattern attribute does. Using a title attribute can help tell the user what to input in cases where the platform wants a certain type of data.

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Chinedu Orie

Awesome article! Quite useful

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Nedy Udombat Author

Thank you Orie

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Johngorithm

Nice one. Really helpful

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Nedy Udombat Author

Thank you @johngorithm I am glad you liked it

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Vlastimil Pospichal

This is a first validation - on client. You need make a second validation on server too.

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Nedy Udombat Author

Thank you Mohammad