re: I'm a .NET Core Contractor, Podcast editor, and host of both The .NET Core Podcast and The Waffling Taylors. Ask me anything! VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

Tell me your journey of how you started the podcast.
Pro and Cons.
How much time do you invest in this despite having a job as well?
If I want to start a Podcast what are Don't and Do for a newbie.

 

So I started the podcast after realising that my blog posts on .NET Core where starting to get longer and longer. One of the longest blog posts clocks in at around three and a half thousand words, which isn't that long for a technical post. But it meant that I was spending a lot of time writing the article and creating the source code to go alongside it.

Mix this in with the fact that I'm an auditory learner - I'm actually listening to an episode of the Retro Asylum podcast as I type this comment - and I started to see that audio would be easier to work with.

I started by writing the first 10 monologues. I figured that if I couldn't come up with content for the first 10 episodes, then I wouldn't be able to come up with enough content to keep the show going. I did this by spending an afternoon at a local coffee shop with a notebook and a pen.

I do all of the production myself: writing questions for guests; interviewing guests; writing the monologues; editing the show; creating the show notes (including the transcriptions); publicising the show; reaching out to guests; etc. As such I spend a lot of time working on the show. A year ago, I would be editing audio over lunch breaks at work and rushing home to continue to produce all evening.

But, since then I've levelled up with my productivity. One of the things that I've walked away from is what Richard Campbell called "The anti-umm thing" (when I interviewed him). To quote Jay Miller (of Productivity in Tech):

For each half an hour of audio, it'll take me around an hour to edit. If you tell me the remove the "umms" and "errs", it'll take another hour to edit that same 30 minutes.

I also dropped from one episode a week to one episode per fortnight. This really helped with the pressure to get the show edited down.

If you're looking to create a podcast, make sure that you really want to do it. It requires a lot of effort, and you need to be sure that you have a large amount of content planned and ready to go before you start. Otherwise you'll run out of content and either podfade or you'll end up putting out low quality, filler episodes.

Also, accept that the first four or five episodes that you record will be terrible. This is because you'll still be trying to figure out what your show should sound like, or what your radio voice sounds like.

You also need to accept that gaining followers with podcasting is a marathon rather than a sprint. Unless you find a super specific niche, you'll find that it will take a long time to gain a good enough following.

 

My major concern is reaching out to guest.
Will they accept my invitation as I am not popular at all.
Why would they invest there time when I am not even paying them.

code of conduct - report abuse