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Introduction to Urqls useQuery React Hook

theianjones profile image Ian Jones ・2 min read

If you would prefer to watch this post, you can do so with this community resource lesson on egghead.io.

The first thing we need to do is import {useQuery} from 'urql.

Heres what our React component looks like:

import React from 'react'
import { useQuery } from 'urql'

function App() {
  let result
  return (
    <div>
      <h1>egghead courses</h1>
      {result && result.data && (
        <ul style={{ listStyle: 'none' }}>
          {result.data.courses.map(({ title }) => (
            <li
              key={title}
              style={{
                display: 'flex',
                alignItems: 'center',
                fontSize: 16,
                fontFamily: 'sans-serif',
                marginBottom: 10,
              }}
            >
              {title}
            </li>
          ))}
        </ul>
      )}
    </div>
  )
}

You can see that we have a result variable that we are going to get our data off of.

We are going to assign useQuery to result.

const [result] = useQuery({})

useQuery takes a configuration object. This is how we tell urql what to query along with some other things we aren't going over in this post.

The query key is required for useQuery to actually run a GraphQL query.

It is unimportant but here's what our query looks like:

const courseQuery = `
  query courses {
    courses {
      title
    }
  }
`
function App() {
  //...
}

We are defining this query above our app component. We need to pass this query to useQuery.

const [result] = useQuery({ query: courseQuery })

Now that we've passed this query in, if you console.log(result) you will see 3 log statements:

{fetching: true, stale: false, error: undefined, data: undefined, extensions: undefined}
{fetching: true, stale: false, error: undefined, data: undefined, extensions: undefined}
{fetching: false, stale: false, error: undefined, data: {}, extensions: undefined}

You can see that there are a couple of properties on result that are useful to use.

You can use result.fetching to check the status of our query. We can return 'Loading...' to our users so they know that something is happening.

function App() {
  const [result] = useQuery({
    query: courseQuery,
  })

  if (result.fetching) {
    return 'Loading...'
  }

  return (
    // ...
  )
}

If there is an error, it will show up in result.error. Let's add this check so we display a message to our users if something terrible happens.

function App() {
  const [result] = useQuery({
    query: courseQuery,
  })

  if (result.fetching) {
    return 'Loading...'
  } else if (result.error) {
    return 'There was an error :('
  }

  return (
    // ...
  )
}

Lastly, if all of these checks return false, you can presume that the query loaded successfully.

As you've seen before, you can access the data with result.data and display the result to your users!

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