DEV Community

loading...

Discussion on: I'm An Impostor

Collapse
webketje profile image
webketje

Some examples where command-line is more interesting to invest in:

  • Changing environment/ tools. If you're consultant learning command line pays off way better than using a GUI (company A requires everyone use IntelliJ, company B Visual Code)
  • No local development possible, no TTY on remote server: you can only use command-line.
Collapse
bytebodger profile image
Adam Nathaniel Davis Author

If you're consultant learning command line pays off way better than using a GUI (company A requires everyone use IntelliJ, company B Visual Code)

I totally understand this point - although... my "answer" to this has been to not even consider opportunities anymore where the employer tries to dictate my toolset. I've had people contact me about Java opportunities, and then they tell me that, "The whole team is standardized on Eclipse." And... that's the end of the discussion for me.

I know that everyone doesn't have the same luxury. But I've actually run into this and I think it's borderline insane. After wrestling for years with Eclipse, and then seeing the night-and-day difference in writing Java in IntelliJ, I'm simply never writing another line of Java code in Eclipse again. If the employer thinks it's critical that I use the same IDE as everyone else on the team, then I am definitely not a good fit for that employer.

All that being said, I know that my little retort here is a diversion - and your central point is understood, and solid.

Thread Thread
darkwiiplayer profile image
DarkWiiPlayer

If the employer thinks it's critical that I use the same IDE as everyone else on the team

Then the employer is probably wondering why none of the top applicants end up taking the job and always end up picking the other company where the boss isn't micro-managing what socks they wear on thursdays.

Forem Open with the Forem app