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How to Create Your Own Linux Commands

xeroxism profile image Alexander Wayne Omorokunwa Originally published at fossnaija.com on ・2 min read

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Who does not like to have the power to create things? Among many powers, Linux gives you the ability to create commands; or wrap default Linux commands in any new command of your choice.

Actually you will not be creating new commands (like “cat”, “ls” or “touch” ) that could be used on any Linux distribution (distro) out there. Far from it. \ **Winks*. Instead you can create some command aliases (or you could say alternate commands) on your local system for personal use – using the Linux **alias* command.

This is especially useful when you have to type long commands; which can become tiring when you have to do this on a regular basis. It can also be useful in helping you putting commands in words that are memorable.

Without much ado lets dive right in.

STEP 1:

Add a file called “.bash_aliases” (create if it doesn’t exist) in your home directory (/user/home).

STEP 2:

Then add any command alias (alternate commands) you want in the general form:

alias command_alias = “actual command”

and then save the file.

Where the “actual_command” is the command to be executed when when the “command_alias” (the new name you have given it) is typed into the command-line.

Example:

>> If the “.bash_aliases” file does not exist create it:

touch .bash_aliases

>> Add the “ sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 start” command as an alias in the file:

alias apacheon = sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 start”

>> Save the file.

The new command alias “ apacheon ” is mapped to the actual command ( sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 start ). This means that any time you enter “ apacheon ” in the terminal it is interpreted by bash to mean “ sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 start ”, which is then executed.

You can add as many aliases as you wish/need in the file.

Examples:

alias apachestop = “/etc/init.d/apache2 stop”

alias systemupdate = “sudo apt-get -y update”

alias wscan = “sudo iwlist wlan0 scan | more”

Try your hands on a few aliases to see for yourself!!!

Happy Linux’NG!

The post How to Create Your Own Linux Commands appeared first on Foss Naija.

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Alexander Wayne Omorokunwa

@xeroxism

Web Developer || Data science & AI || Editor @FossNaija

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