re: What is that one tool/stack/framework that you have no interest with despite the popularity? VIEW POST

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re: Truth been told 👌 Docker is one of the tech killers of this century. Not just that... Often, they continue to make more amazing stuff!
 

That would be a good survey.

Which has been the gratest softare paradigm shift in the industry?

I did really like a book that a friend did borrow me:

Software Paradigms from Stephen H. Kaisler

It makes a good presentation of all those paradigms and the context where they are useful. Not a compendium, just an introduction.

I am confident that many people might have creativity peaks that can bring the current paradigms down just by being informed on the current problems and where everything fits into.

And that's what be the main concern of this post. I guess nobody needs to be an expert in docker, git or anything other tool it with success to build new creative and useful stuffs.

The Full-Stack way of thinking should not be ... "I need to be an expert on everything", just I need to know what is everything for and which problem it solves for my team or the industry. Of course more deep knowledge on every stuff gives you more control and increase the possibilities of success. But the knowledge adquision process should be Breadth-first and just Depth-first when required by a project milestone or a debugging process.

That's why I have always preferred books who present introductions to those that present exhaustive compilations of something.

I am waiting for some math guru to write a similar book for the math branches and their current applications to the industry. Many paradigms have been broken with this kind of reasoning:

That was applied with success in this field, but that other field has some similarities with it. What if we apply that also here ?

So the question should not about the tools or frameworks, the should be a about the paradigm shift that originated them and the problem they solve.

A good exercise for that is reviewing the tech comparison charts of wikipedia, the software reviews, etc.

Absolutely true!

Paradigms, architectural styles/patterns, and design patterns are really essential to properly solve a problem.

I really feel thankful being a software architect, so that I can realize when someone jumping for microservices solution (with docker, kubernetes, and whatever super duper tech) just cuz it's fancy 🤦

Or automating tests with Selenium just cuz big company X are using it 🤮

As you said, understanding the tech might be important to finish a specific project, but realizing the problems which the tech solves is x10 billion more important.

I guess it's time to write an article on "Why Software Architecture REALLY Matters for All Developers".

Looking forward to the article! I love it when an article breaks down the tiny problems from the top level to see the big picture (in this case, software architecture). I would love to learn.

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