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My second day on the job at my current job was probably my worst ever. I was sitting in my new (disheveled) office at my first full-time job, and I had some weird pain and became convinced that I was dying. So I asked my new coworker in the office next door if he could take me to the hospital. Of course, I'd had a panic attack: I wasn't dying, I merely felt convinced of it.

New jobs / the twenties can be stressful. My coworkers were cool about it though. I'm still working there almost 15 years later.

 

Good thing you didn‘t let it bring you down.

 

After almost 2 years working on the company they asked me do to some shady code inside the application. At the time I was so hopeless with all the things going wrong that I didn't refuse and just let this thing pass doing what they wanted. After some months I quit the job and I regret till today sacrificing my values for 1 more month of salary.

 

Worst day, but has a happy ending:

I was working on a team that provided an important library. While the library was theoretically generic, we really had one client within the company and they had a lot of weight within the company.

So one day we get assigned a high severity issue about how our library isn't working and it's showing up at the top of the stacktrace.

We had made some recent changes to the library (this clouded my judgment) but we had thoroughly tested them.

I spent all day working with the build they had provided me and there were all kinds of things wrong with how our library was working. I started freaking out and it didn't help that to get my dev environment to match their build version took a long time.

At this point I had manager after manager (going further up the chain) coming by my desk and messaging me for an update ASAP.

Long story short: I found that they had pulled a seemingly completely random old version from our library! So of course nothing new was working right and why "OurLibrary" was showing up in the stacktrace!

I had spent the whole time assuming it was our library and that they had the latest commit since they were the first to point the finger. I'd been in IT long enough to not take those assumptions as given but with the heat coming from managers I lost sight of that.

Solution: slam the ticket back to their team and tell them that they need to always merge from the tip of our release branch.

Moral of the story: Don't Panic. Verify all assumptions.

On the same team, I also had the pleasure of flying out on a red-eye to a client for no other reason that to just make people feel better by "having a dev on-site."

Needless to say, I left.

 

I once quit a job. I had been thinking about it for a while, but kept avoiding the confrontation with my boss until the end of the year. Finally, I quit. And then, for some crazy reason I can‘t even explain today as it was so long ago, I went to the company‘s Christmas party. Everybody knew. A sequence of bad choices.

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Bertil Muth profile image
Agile coach and developer