Accessing React State right after setting it

Sung M. Kim on August 25, 2018

Photo by Celso on Unsplash As I have been browsing Stack Overflow questions, I’ve noticed that many bugs are due to trying to access a state val... [Read Full]
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React's state management is so cumbersome (including redux). I am making an open source state management (for React, Angular, Vue) that will be as easy as possible for newbies (and includes cool stuff like very simple observables for others). Follow me on twitter if you want to know about that in a month (or two) twitter.com/not_borats_code

 

I've started using MirrorJS, and I found it to be quite easy to get started with.

MirrorJS looks like something one with an extensive experience with Redux. Kind of like how I might end up organizing redux code.

 

Seems like MirrorJS while having good intentions and is overall a good thing, sacrifices features to simplicity (quote from their readme: "define routes without caring about history"). Also if it does not have compatibility with react, I doubt it has a bright future.

P.S. I've looked at your profile, if you have .NET background, you might want to look to angular instead of react. The former is a more solid base for new, big-scaled project, the latter is good for small to medium projects, or for existing projects with legacy (in any language).

Thanks Nurbol for the tip on Angular. I will consider it over Vue for the next framework.

if it does not have compatibility with react

Might ask what you meant by the compatibility issue?

Vue is also good, but it is in the same basket with React, unlike Angular. By compatibility I meant the same API. If MirrorJS does not compatible with React, all the libraries and entire ecosystem for React is useless for MirrorJS. I just didn't look if it's compatible, so I don't know if it's true.

I see that MirrorJS has a devdependency on "react": "^16.3.2", so if React v.17 is release it'd not be compatible.

 

It's kinda strange that the setState() method doesn't return a promise.

 

React uses a callback style programming mostly as promises are still difficult to grasp and a little bit more expensive.

 

True, but in React-Native examples they also use promises and async functions.

 

Don't forget to use shouldComponentUpdate, because you're gonna make an infinite recursion in your componentDidUpdate

 

Thanks for the tip there Truong.

Would you share a case how an infinite recursion could occur?

 

You can read it in the reactjs documentation, it says:

You may call setState() immediately in componentDidUpdate() but note that it must be wrapped in a condition like in the example above, or you’ll cause an infinite loop.

The example is

componentDidUpdate(prevProps) {
  // Typical usage (don't forget to compare props):
  if (this.props.userID !== prevProps.userID) {
    this.fetchData(this.props.userID);
  }
}

In my case, i update and re-render component whenever i receive new data from websocket.

it must be wrapped in a condition

Ah without it, a component definitely state to update infinitely.

Thanks Truong.

 

Thanks for the article! I just had this problem yesterday. It took a while to figure out that the problem was setState and not the helper function I was running just ahead of it but I eventually realized my error. I used a callback instead of the lifecycle method because it was all part of a form submit. Hmmm, I just realized there's a better way... Off to improve my code!

 

You're welcome there Andie.

But be aware of componentDidUpdate causing an infinite recursion as Truong pointed out.

You can read it in the reactjs documentation, it says:

You may call setState() immediately in componentDidUpdate() but note that it must be wrapped in a condition like in the example above, or you’ll cause an infinite loop.

The example is

componentDidUpdate(prevProps) {
  // Typical usage (don't forget to compare props):
  if (this.props.userID !== prevProps.userID) {
    this.fetchData(this.props.userID);
  }
}

In my case, i update and re-render component whenever i receive new data from websocket.

 

I faced similar problem implementing react native version of a 2048 game variation & used settimeout of 100ms & get rid of the problem & later figured out that setState is async & modified the code to use the callback.

 

It seems like you, & I (and this other person) has a similar thought process 😅.

 

Funny thing is, I haven't ran across that error yet because I normally use componentDidUpdate for those state changes. Tutorials I followed taught my well I guess... hahaha. +10pts for that online editor you're using :p

 

3 . Keep your data in a Store/model, you have the latest data anytime while keeping the "single source of truth"

 

Hi @bgadrian , did you mean using libraries such as Redux/MobX?

 

That would be one way yes.

The idea is that if you need a state object and the React way is a problem you can move it to a model. I would not recommend it for something simple like your examples of course, just stating that this possibility exists.

That sounds like a spot-on idea.

I recently created a small web page and used MirrorJS (uses Redux underneath) to keep all states in one place.

setState wasn't needed in most of places and all the states were managed in one place.

 

Sometimes state changes from higher order components or from implicit state changes so you use componentDidUpdate to properly catch the new state and perform some additional logic.

 

interesting post. My favorite solution is to use requestAnimationFrame for the block that want to receive the new state. I usually limit usage of componentDidUpdate in this case since it can cause forever loop if there is any state update in componentDidUpdate

 
 

Woohoo great to hear that the post was helpful 😄

Let's hope together and edge case like this can be handled without much thought 😎

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