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Why read Kent C. Dodds articles or newsletter

Jacob Evans
FullStack Software Engineer @ Cloudflare | Air Force Veteran | Hardware Enthusiast | Outdoorsman | OSS Enthusiast & Contributor
・1 min read

TL;DR Short answer yes, blogsite

https://kentcdodds.com/blog/write-fewer-longer-tests
This blog incorporates many great concepts on testing tying together a lot of older articles Kent has written, a lot of them pertaining to React Testing Library (Kent created).

I recommend a lot of things that Kent writes, even just following him on Twitter is has benefits. I personally enjoy writing tests, refactoring and debugging (I love features too don't get me wrong.) Kent has insights and philosophies behind a lot of these things that I not only think are technically sound but agree with personally as well. Especially when it comes to things that have to do with testing, he has some of the best philosophies surrounding testing and Reacts Testing Library is built around these fundamental concepts.

These testing philosophies have even been adopted and encouraged by the React core team, stating in their documentation https://reactjs.org/docs/testing.html#tools

React Testing Library is a set of helpers that let you test React components without relying on their implementation details. This approach makes refactoring a breeze and also nudges you towards best practices for accessibility. Although it doesn’t provide a way to “shallowly” render a component without its children, a test runner like Jest lets you do this by mocking.

Discussion (3)

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patryktech profile image
Patryk • Edited

If you meant that as a question - yes, definitely.

You should always read as many quality sources as possible, and I think Kent C. Dodds has very good content. You might not agree with all his opinions (I haven't disagreed with anything I have read so far), but getting information from different sources, thinking about things different ways, forming your own opinions, and learning to evaluate content is always good. I often read posts about subjects I am already familiar with just to get another opinion. Sometimes I learn something new, sometimes I disagree with the choices the author makes.

(I also haven't read this particular post, but I shall.)

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jacobmgevans profile image
Jacob Evans Author

It's a rhetorical question. My very short article makes it clear I believe anyone working with tests or JavaScript, in general, should be reading his content.

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jacobmgevans profile image
Jacob Evans Author

I should name the article better... Suggestions on the title?