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Discussion on: Why you should Stop using CSS Frameworks

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matthewbdaly profile image
Matthew Daly

Your designs will look generic, many people use bootstrap, tailwind, etc. They all look the same.

This is probably true in most cases for Bootstrap, but it's emphatically not the case for Tailwind - it simply doesn't work like that. There's no such thing as a Tailwind component the way there is in Bootstrap. Instead, each utility class is pretty much a one-to-one mapping to a CSS rule. This also applies to the issue about creativity - Tailwind just provides a different way to use those CSS rules that's more convenient.

You will eventually forget css and not be able to use it when css frameworks are not an option

This isn't the case for Tailwind either since it's quite a thin layer on top of CSS.

And you don't mention one common use case for Bootstrap - admin interfaces. Many applications I've built for clients have needed an admin interface, and you can't as a rule justify very much time for it, but at the same time leaving it unstyled is not an option and it needs to be presentable. Bootstrap is a good fit for something like this.

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urielbitton profile image
Uriel Bitton Author

I have designed many admin interfaces using custom code, Why do you need to use bootstrap?

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matthewbdaly profile image
Matthew Daly

You don't need to, but it's hard to justify spending much time building and styling an admin interface that will only ever be seen by a handful of administrators, especially when you're doing client work. Bootstrap provides a workable set of components suitable for this use case.

In an agency environment it's very hard to justify spending more time than you need to on an admin interface when the cost has already been agreed and deadlines often slip.