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Core Programming principles in R

Ruthvik Raja M.V
Masters in Computer Engineering at University of Guelph, Canada.
Updated on ・2 min read

Hello everyone, let us dive into the basics of R programming:
Before getting started with R, download the necessary files like R Studio and R. But don't worry because I already wrote a blog on how to install R on macOS and Windows. The link to the blog is mentioned below:
https://dev.to/ruthvikraja_mv/installing-r-studio-on-mac-59hc
The following topics are covered in this article:

1.Types of variables.
2.Logical variables and operators.
3.Conditional and loop statements.

The R code for the above concepts are as follows:

######################## SECTION 1 ###########################
# To execute code use -> command + return[Shortcut] in MAC
# integer
# In R Programming for assigning value to a variable the following symbol is used:
 # <- [Which denotes an arrow] but “=” also works for assigning value to a variable.
## Types of Variables
x<-2L # By default x would be double if we store 2 in it so, L is used to denote an integer type
typeof(x) # Used to check the type of an object
# double
y<-2.5
typeof(y)
# complex
z<-3+2i
typeof(z)
# character
a<-h
typeof(a)
# logical
q<-TRUE #(OR) q<-T
typeof(q)

## Using Variables
A<-10
B<-5
C<-A+B
C # To print object C
# variable 1 → Comments
var1<-2.5
var2<-4
result<-var1/var2
result
sqrt(var2) # Inbuilt function
greeting <-Hello
typeof(greeting)
 # OR #
class(greeting)
name<-Bob
message<-paste(greeting, name)
message
Hello + Bob # This throws an error whereas in Python it works -> print(“Hello”+”Bob”)

# Execute:
# Logical Operators:
4<5
100>10
4==5
4!=5
5<=5
5>=5
# NOT Operator -> !
# OR Operator -> |
# AND Operator -> &
# isTRUE()
# To find the remainder the following command is used in R:
5%%4 # Not 5%4 as we do in Python
result <- !TRUE
result
isTRUE(result)
# while loop
while(TRUE){print(Hello)} # In python identation is used whereas in R curly brackets are used
# for loop
for(i in 1:5){
 print(Hello R)
 }
# Here i is an iterator and prints “Hello R” for 5 times
# Here 1:5 represents a vector of numbers
# Execute the following codes:
1:5
for(i in 5:10){
 print(i)
}
# if statement
# Let us generate one random normalized number:
x<-rnorm(1) # Since, it is a normalized number the mean is 1 and standard deviation is 0
if(x>1){
 answer<-Greater than 1"
}else{
 if(x>=-1){
 answer<-”Between -1 and 1"
 }
 else{
 answer<=Less than -1"
 }
}
# The above structure is a nested if structure
# Now let us implement else if:
if(x>1){
 answer<-”Greater than 1"
}else if(x>=-1){ # In python we use elif() for else if()
 answer<-Between -1 and 1"
 }else{
 answer<=”Less than -1"
}
# To remove a variable the following command is used:
rm(answer)
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Thank you, for spending your time on my post. Follow me for more updates on R.

The next post will be on Fundamentals of R[Section 2]

Happy coding…

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