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Recommended Reading for Developers

abhishekalbert profile image Abhishek ・6 min read

Hello there!! I'm back with another article i.e Recommended Reading for Developers.And also given a link to download a soft copy of the book.

To make better software, you need to understand how people work, and that is what the books I recommend tend to focus on.

So why you are waiting here the list given below :

  1. Code Complete 2
  2. Steve McConnell's Code Complete 2 is the Joy of Cooking for software developers. Reading it means that you enjoy your work, you're serious about what you do, and you want to keep improving. In Code Complete, Steve notes that the average programmer reads less than one technical book per year. The very act of reading this book already sets you apart from probably ninety percent of your fellow developers. In a good way.

    Link: Code Complete 2

  3. The Mythical Man-Month

  4. This twenty-five year old book boldly illustrates one point: computers may change, but people don't.

    Reading this classic work will certainly be a better use of your time than poring over the latest thousand page technical tome du jour.

    Link: The Mythical Man-Month

  5. Don't Make Me Think

  6. The single best book on usability I've ever read. The title says "web usability" but don't be fooled by its faux specificity. Steve Krug covers every important usability concept in this book, and covers it well. It's almost fun. If you choose to read only one book on usability, choose this one. It's chock full of great information, and it's presented in a concise, approachable format. It's suitable for any audience: technical, non-technical, user, developer, manager, you name it.

    Link: Don't Make Me Think

  7. Rapid Development
  8. The full title of this book is Rapid Development: Taming Wild Software Development Schedules, which isn't just long-winded and vaguely ridiculous, it's also an unfortunate misnomer.

    Rapid Development isn't about rapid development. It's aboutthe reality of failure . The vast majority of software development projects will fail: they will overrun their schedules, produce substandard results, or sometimes not even finish at all. This isn't an argument; it's a statistical fact. The unpleasant truth is that your team has to be very good to simply avoid failing, much less to succeed. While that may sound depressing – okay, it is depressing– you'll still want to read this book.

    Why? Because half of success is not repeating the same mistakes you, or other people, have made. The epiphany offered in this book is that making mistakes is good– so long as they are all new, all singing, all dancing mistakes. If you're making the same old classic mistakes, you've failed before you've even begun. And you probably have no idea how likely it is that you're making one of these mistakes right now.

    Our field is one of the few where change is the only constant, so it's only natural to embrace that change and try different "Rapid" development techniques. But the converse isn't true. We can't assume that so much has changed since 1970 that all the old software development lessons are obsolete and irrelevant when compared to our hot new technology. It's the same old story: computers have changed; people haven't. At least have some idea of what works and what doesn't before you start– in McConnell's words, "read the instructions on the paint can before painting." Sure, it sounds obvious enough until you read this book and realize how rarely that actually happens in our field.

    According to the book, technically, one-quarter. But I think it's more than that.

    Link: Rapid Development

  9. Peopleware
  10. If you've ever seen the performance of an all-star sports team suffer due to poor coaching, you'll appreciate this book. It doesn't matter how many "coding superstars" you've got when none of them can talk to each other, or agree on anything. And it no developer, however talented, can work effectively when constantly being barraged with minor interruptions. Developers aren't known for their people skills, per se, but here's the ironic part: the success of your project may hinge on just that. If you have any legitimate aspirations to be a "Team Leader" in practice instead of in name only, you need to pick up a copy of this book.

    While Peopleware is full of great, totally valid points, it also implies a level of employee control over the workplace that is pure fantasy at most companies. But at least you'll know when your work environment, or your team, are the real problem – and more importantly, what to do about it.

  11. The Design of Everyday Things
  12. It can be incredibly frustrating to develop software, because so much can go wrong. A lot of what we do is defensive: trying to anticipate what will go wrong before it does. It's mentally fatiguing, and can eventually manifest itself in some negative ways. I sometimes describe this to non-technical people as building a watch with a thousand moving parts, all of which can fail randomly at the slightest provocation. Good times!

    Designing software is difficult, to be sure, but designing a door is difficult too. The nuances of design extend into every object you touch, whether it's some hot new SQL engine, or a humble shoe. This book will give you a new appreciation of the "devil in the details." If designing a door isn't the no-brainer we thought it was, maybe it's time to give ourselves a break for not being able to design software perfectly, either.

    Link: The Design of Everyday Things

    This one is the list of books which i prefer . For more please visit here

    One more important this the

    Source: The source of information or this article is taken from Coding Horror website(Blog).

    Hope You like it.

    See You in next article until keep coding, keep learning.

    Happy Coding.

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