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Chris Bongers
Chris Bongers

Posted on • Originally published at daily-dev-tips.com

I stopped using Visual Studio Code

Not because it's bad, not at all, and to be fully honest, I use it for my blog still 🀫.

But because I started using Webstorm, a JetBrains product and love it.

Let me explain why I love this one so much. There are a couple of game-changing elements to it.

Full-power but fully customizable

I think the first time, I was overwhelmed by all the panels, menus, and actions.

However, you quickly realize they do have a use, but until you learn about that, you can remove panels to make it a super clean editor.

Example of the basic editor opening up.

WebStorm overview

All in - Out of the box

One of the great features of Visual Studio Code is that it has so many amazing plugins available to make your experience better.

When I downloaded WebStorm, I looked for amazing plugins but quickly realized you don't even need them.

It has so many great things already installed out of the box that you rarely need a plugin.

And if you do, their plugin ecosystem is also huge.

Some examples of things that work out of the box:

  • All JavaScript autocomplete and can even fix issues for you
  • Smart refactoring
  • Testing!
  • Fast file search and global search
  • Live share build-in
  • Tailwind classes autocomplete
  • Amazing themes
  • Source control included
  • and much more

If you need a plugin, check out the plugin repo on the Jetbrains website.

Search works

The cool part about WebStorm is that it has perfect search functionality.

We can search for either file and actions using the double shift search.
This is a powerful way to find files by name, actions, plugins, etc.

WebStorm search

Alternatively, we get find-in files, which can be used to find any code in your files!
Again super powerful search functionality.

Find in files

Tests

If you are writing a lot of tests, WebStorm has your back!
It provides a super robust testing flow, where you can quickly test singular test cases and even quick-view snapshots.

It's super easy to test single tests or files.
You can even quickly debug your tests in WebStorm.

Singular test in WebStorm

Code inspection

Another great option it comes with is code inspection, and this has many incredible benefits to it.

It can quickly detect any issues you might have with your ESLint rules and unused methods.

Unused functions in WebStorm

It will also tell you when you are doing things that don't make sense, like not including alt tags on images.

WebStorm auto-missing

And the list goes on of code inspection it can do to help you write robust code.

Speed

Another great thing about WebStorm is that it's simply super quick.
It runs projects without hesitation and has no issue refactoring a widely used import.

Since I started using WebStorm, it hasn't had a single issue (about three months now).

VSC was also pretty fast to me, but WebStorm feels a bit more stable. I had VSC crash on me before, especially while opening large files or refactoring widely used imported files.

Conclusion

I'm not here to tell you that you have to switch.
Just sharing why I switched and what benefits I see in WebStorm.

The obvious con is that it's a paid product compared to VSC, which is free.

Thank you for reading, and let's connect!

Thank you for reading my blog. Feel free to subscribe to my email newsletter and connect on Facebook or Twitter

Discussion (157)

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leob profile image
leob • Edited on

Okay lol, well actually I made exactly the opposite journey - I started with a Jetbrains product, then switched to VSCode, and never looked back.

For me VSCode was a breath of fresh air, lightweight, quick to fire up, quick to create a project (well you actually don't "create a project" anymore - BIG advantage) - easy to set up, easy to learn, easy to use, etc.

Actually I have a Java background and had to use Eclipse for years, which is the most baroque and complicated IDE you can imagine (barring the horrible Apple Xcode environment, lol). Never again that, just give me an editor (which is what VSCode is, a glorified editor), the command line, and that's it.

I get it that WebStorm is more feature-rich and way more sophisticated, but I'm not using all those features - KISS, quick and simple does it for me.

Even my VSCode is rather bare-bones - I'm keeping the number of plugins to a minimum, no fancy themes or a gazillion plugins for me - it only slows me down ... the biggest "investment" I did in VSCode was to learn the keyboard shortcuts - virtually ALL of them - because it makes you SO much more productive.

Ultimately the point is that VSCode clicks with the way I work, but I completely understand that WebStorm might click with the way someone else works.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

I think that's kind of key.
VSC with no plugins == fast, but once you start adding stuff it becomes so slow.

To me all those things seem to work perfectly fine in WS out of the box.

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leob profile image
leob • Edited on

Right, that's the point, WS is batteries included, plug 'n' play, while VSCode is more DYI ... but I have a minimal number of plugins installed, and I checked right now and I even uninstalled 4 or 5 plugins that I never use, lol.

But, you mentioned search, and I do like the full-text search in VSCode quite a lot - it's fast enough and well, it's simple, there we go again haha ;)

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mikeyglitz profile image
mikeyGlitz

The biggest selling feature for vs code for me is development containers. I think it simplifies contribution. Clone the project. Start the container. You don't have to waste time installing SDKs and plugins because they're in the container.

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leob profile image
leob

Oh yeah that's a good one, and you can even run your VSCode completely "in the cloud", and access it with a thin client (browser) - because well, VSCode is of course "just" a web app (packaged with Electron) ...

Imagine that you're on holiday on a tropical island, you think of a cool little feature, you open your tablet under the shade of a palm tree, and with a few clicks you fire up your IDE and your dev containers - and bada bing bada boom there it is, you do a little bit coding, with another click you deploy it - job done, back to the swimming pool - how cool is that?

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mikeyglitz profile image
mikeyGlitz

Well I'd argue you'd still need a good CI environment for the deployment aspect. GH Actions and GitLab are pretty good for that imo, but I get what you're saying.

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ishanpro profile image
Ishan Tiwari

That's why I am a full time Sublime texter now with Sublime merge.

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mikeyglitz profile image
mikeyGlitz

I'm not sure if that's a limitation of Electron (JavaScript for desktop) that VS Code is built on

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yuridevat profile image
π•π•¦π•π•šπ•’ πŸ‘©πŸ»β€πŸ’»

Me too :)

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himanshugoel profile image
Himanshu Goel

I can second that claim. Even I also used WebStorm in past, but facing issue with over-consuming of RAM memory and getting unresponsive. After moving to VS Code, it felt so much light weighted and sleek.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Sounds like a lot of people see it that way.
From what I can tell it also seems to make a difference wether it's mac/windows editions.

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swpalmer profile image
Scott Palmer • Edited on

I’m also a Java developer that isn’t impressed with Eclipse. (I use NetBeans.). But I’ve found VSCode for Java is quite a pain. It doesn’t follow conventions and pollutes my project directory with another set of compiled classes in som bin folder or something - why??? It has trouble figuring out the classpath, so the functionality it is supposed to have is usually unavailable. Given that’s I’m doing a lot of mixed web and Java stuff these days I was hoping for a better experience. The HTLM/CSS/JS stuff in VSCode seems to work reasonably well.

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leob profile image
leob • Edited on

I wouldn't use VSCode for Java, I'd use Eclipse or something like that - even though I dislike Eclipse, it does work quite well for Java.

VSCode is simple and lightweight, Java is anything but - the requirements of Java are so specific, VSCode was not designed for that.

I'm not really doing Java dev anymore, but if I did I'd probably use Eclipse ... or maybe Netbeans, or alternatively a JetBrains product.

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joelbonetr profile image
JoelBonetR

+1 here. Ditched webstorm apart in fabour of VSCode πŸ˜…

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hilleer profile image
Daniel Hillmann • Edited on

It feels like you knew everything I wanted to write

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leob profile image
leob

Haha okay, I suppose a lot of people migrating to VSCode have the same kind of experience with it :-)

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hxavs profile image
Jeremiah S • Edited on

Yeah. I used to use phpstorm and webstorm. I use vscode for most of the development I do these days. Also with its api and extensive repository of community developed extensions you can really customize your experience and the tools that are available.

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leob profile image
leob

Absolutely ... and it's lightweight, that's probably the biggest thing for me :)

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hoangviethung profile image
Roger

Easy to set up, easy to learn, easy to use, etc. Nice Bro !!

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yuridevat profile image
π•π•¦π•π•šπ•’ πŸ‘©πŸ»β€πŸ’»

An article I HAD to read. Wow, I started with WebStorm but then switched to VSCode for the front end and wouldn't go back. But I use IntelliJ Edu for the backend when I write Java, and I would also try PyCharm and the other products because I like JetBrains Academy.

It's so interesting what developers prefer and for what reasons. Thanks for pointing out the benefits you see.

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snaidamast profile image
snaidamast

I am currently using PyCharm Community Edition to bring myself up to speed with Python (I am a VB.NET\C# engineer). I love it for its feature set...

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

I've probably used most IDE's out there, but for my personal needs at this time of my career WebStorm has too many advantages I haven't seen elsewhere.

(Biggest being the test I think actually)

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natescode profile image
Nathan Hedglin

Interesting, I'm moving more to neovim, i3 and tmux myself. Otherwise, VSCodium because I don't need Microsoft's tracking and closed-source binaries.

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nimoi profile image
Subtlebot

Now we're talking. I can search anywhere in Vim too with ripgrep and fzf and I bet you it's faster than those bigger IDEs

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danielratmiroff profile image
Daniel

Neovim is the best. Never had so much fun coding as in neovim

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lucaboriani profile image
Luca

Wow, didn't know about vscodium, that's something I'll have to try... next Monday πŸ˜€

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rxliuli profile image
rxliuli

Another more obvious disadvantage is that it is not suitable for large monorepo repositories, such as those in a company with more than 90 sub-projects, it becomes almost unusable. Also, I'm still a paid user of jetbrains ide now, but I've completely switched to vscode for the front end.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

I'm actually finding the opposite with webstorm, way more stable on larger projects from my side 🀯

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rxliuli profile image
rxliuli • Edited on

Maybe your project is not big enough, here is a basic overview of our project information

Language                     files          blank        comment           code
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeScript                    1054          10239          17515          79359
Vuejs Component                275           3137           2608          41652
JavaScript                      11           2816            288          16483
HTML                             8             43              0           3245
LESS                            19            223             12           2099
GraphQL                         32             71             37           1871
JSON                            51              1              0           1433
SVG                             81              1              3            992
CSS                             15            116             11            984
SCSS                             5             19              8            186
Bourne Shell                     1             12              8             31
Markdown                         1              5              0              6
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SUM:                          1553          16683          20490         148341
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

This is the project I mainly work on github.com/dailydotdev/apps.

Surprised VSC works moire stable for you.
But happy to hear you found a good IDE that works for your setup.

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Mike Talbot

I'm all for Webstorm, especially since they upgraded it to be a full IDE - it used to not have multiple projects and all that jazz and I had to use IntelliJ - but that has a lot of Java bloat you don't need.

I find Webstorm super fast, the integrated debugger is very slick, but the "it always finds it" search anywhere is a killer feature for me. The other great features are the really powerful refactorings that mean I build much cleaner code. The multi language support for SQL, GraphQL etc with all of the intellisense means I'm rarely looking things up.

I've used VSCode a fair amount and I do like it, but it never seems to be 100% consistent for me.

The new wave of JetBrains IDEs are coming. I'm very excited to see where this takes them.

A nod to DataGrip and Rider too - really great IDEs for C#, C++ and databases. I'm a happy customer and have been for 5 or 6 years now.

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jmau111 profile image
jmau111

The "Storm suite" is amazing. It's not exactly the cheapest service, but it's totally worth it. I think you're right to switch to a more specialized IDE that fits your needs.

What I don't appreciate in VSCode is the telemetry enabled by default. It collects lots of data. Of course, you can disable tracking in the settings, but most users won't do it.

I'm not that surprised, considering it's a Microsoft product. For those who look for an alternative, there's also VS codium, which is an open-source clone.

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renanfranca profile image
Renan Franca

Thank you! I disable telemetry πŸ‘

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

I also used Atom before, cool product, but also started to crash almost daily πŸ˜…
For me WebStorm solves all my problems at this point in my career, so very happy with it.

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afternoonpm profile image
AfterNoonPM

Yeah, atom does that sometimes.
Also github decided to sunset(discontinue) it, so they're archiving the repo in december. Kinda sad, especially because I had finally found an editor I liked, but after the announcement, I switched to vscode, and it's working great!

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jmau111 profile image
jmau111

It's VS codium.

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moopet profile image
Ben Sinclair

we get find-in files, which can be used to find any code in your files!

Is there something special about this that I'm missing? I haven't use VSCode much, but I'd assume it'd have something that does this, it's pretty basic functionality available in most editors or IDEs, isn't it?

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fyodorio profile image
Fyodor

The search flow is very smooth, switching between file-level, folder-level and project-level search is superfast, and the feature of β€œsearch anything” is just superb. The pleasure comes with practice πŸ˜„ but it’s really hard to use anything other than WebStorm after using WebStorm.

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moopet profile image
Ben Sinclair

What would be the difference between "search anything" and "project-level"? Or do you mean that the search includes results from the editor, like the command pallette or something?

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fyodorio profile image
Fyodor • Edited on

Yes, closer to the VS Code’s command palette but less chaotic I’d say

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Ah nothing new, it just works really well in WS
As where VSC has the same, but it's in one uniform search.

This really comes down to preference I think.

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mcsee profile image
Maxi Contieri • Edited on

Hi @dailydevtips1 . I've been reading you posts por over 2 years.

This is exactly the point. I came to the same conclusion regarding JetBrains vs VisualStudio.
Running tests smoothly is a killer difference and you start to notice it once you have to manage a LOT of them

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Yep! The test cases where the real selling point.
Actually our CTO was advocating to switch us to WS, but we never saw the need.

He showed us the singular test and snapshots ones and I immediately switched πŸ˜‚

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fjones profile image
FJones • Edited on

I'm very much a JetBrains evangelist these days, too. The wealth of out-of-the-box features in all of their IDEs is excellent for someone like me who works with a bunch of different languages.
VSCode requires a lot of setup, and setting it up for everything at the same time just bogs it down massively. Meanwhile the JetBrains IDEs are all fully functional, fast, and just work.

Edit: Also, the coherency of keyboard shortcuts and the entire UX between the different IDEs vastly outperforms anything a wealth of VSC plugins would achieve. It's tailored exactly the right way.

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DimitrisBor

Many times i come across blog posts like "40 must have plugins for VSCode" that Intellij has built in and i'm like, what the heck? I understand that it gives you the choice to customize it as you want, but if i had to switch now to VS Code i would have to search and find all the plugins i need to have the same functionality.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Yeah true,

I started thinking I needed to load all kinds of plugins into WS, learning quickly it was all ready built-in.

To me VSC also get's way slower with every plugin you add-on.
Pretty sure if you would mimic WS functionality with plugins it's un-runable. (but this is just a thought)

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creotip profile image
Ruslan Elishaev

Funny to read this today. I’m actually switching from Intellij to vscode after 8 years of usage.

Intellij is a RAM and CPU killer. It become so slow, that sometimes it’s impossible to use it anymore.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

I'm seeing this a lot and still surprised to experience the complete opposite.
Just a follow up question are you on Windows or Mac?

As I think it has a lot to do with that (from reading the comments here)
I'm on Mac and for me WS is way faster/lower on resources

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creotip profile image
Ruslan Elishaev

I'm on MAC:
MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)
2.3 GHz 8-Core Intel Core i9
32 GB 2667 MHz DDR4
AMD Radeon Pro 5500M 4 GB

Currently working on huge monorepo with Apollo microservices and module Federated React apps, which means many instances of node running on the background.

Intellij is extremly slow to work on this stack.

Now i'm testing vscode vs WebStorm. Will update later about the results!

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creotip profile image
Ruslan Elishaev

After 2 working days, I can confirm that WebStorm is Much faster/less RAM cunsumer than IntelliJ.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Not sure you have the right names there?

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jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy

I never saw the attraction of VS Code - seems like a slower, more resource intensive ripoff of SublimeText

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

I mean it's a great IDE, especially the free part.
But again lots of customisations and personalisation are also a big pro.

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shshank profile image
Shshank

I was using Sublime before and now VS, it's quite fast, and the main reason is fast global search, also it donot prompt to purchase 😌. VS code is quite fast, as you started installing plugins, themes, the speed decreases gradually, kepping it minimal will it make it super fast.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

100% and if it works for you I wouldn't switch.
Keeping it lean and minimal definitely helps with keeping it fast.

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shshank profile image
Shshank

But now it crashes, and sometime saving takes a bit time, sometime it stops auto closing tags, for which I need fo restart the VS code, and so really looking for an alternate, but with faster global search.

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firdoussross_69 profile image
Firdouss Ross

I’ve used Webstorm for a long time. I can agree with all your points.

But after I switched my main machine to Windows, I switched to VS Code simply because Webstorm and WSL does not play well together after some time. This is a known issue on both Webstorm and WSL.

On the mac though, Webstorm is still my main IDE

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Hmm interesting!
So maybe the slow experience is more a windows vs mac related thing 🀯

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firdoussross_69 profile image
Firdouss Ross

It could be. That has been my experience if working on windows with WSL. Without WSL it is fine.

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gvescu profile image
Gustavo Vera Scuderi

Every new release of RubyMine I download it for testing and it looks so cool, but for some reason I always end up going back to VSCode. I think I don't know how to configure it for my project requirements (Docker/WSL2), but I see a lot of debugging configuration that overwhelms me and in the end I end up just running rspec manually.

Doesn't help either that some times I have some freelance work in other languages and I'd need the other IDEs too.

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pavonz profile image
Andrea Pavoni • Edited on

I’m glad you found a tool that improves your development experience and I’m not here to judge or start an old school flame war. I’m not into Java-based IDEs because I found them slow and bloated. Regarding the features you listed, I achieved same results with both neovim and VSCode, sure they aren’t plug-and-play to setup the first time, but I come from the old times where you had to recompile the Linux kernel and libraries (hello Slackware and Gentoo Linux!) to get a decent almost-working desktop, so maybe I’m just used to some tinkering.

Just my 2 cents to add to the discussion.

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2kabhishek profile image
Abhishek Keshri

I actually went from VS Code to Neovim πŸ˜†
This post inspired me to write about my journey as well

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Love it!
Let me know once you written your post, would love to read it πŸ’–

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meatboy profile image
Meat Boy

After trying most of the editors and ide available on the market I can recommend jetbrain tools. Especially if you are working with different technologies. Switching between ide or using IntelliJ is seamless and powerful.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Happy to hear you have the same experience.

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Wade Zimmerman

JetBrains is nice but it has a heavy price tag and can be a bit of a memory hog. However, I think JetBrains have a better understanding of the code base than VSCode. A prime example is the premium Laravel IDE for JetBrains. It costs money, but it is far superior to what VSCode offers.

VSCode is still a really good editor. I use it for quickly editing files and one off projects from the command line.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

The price is the biggest pitfall I think.
I would still recommend VSC to most people especially those just starting out.

If you get your company to pay or have enough clients, storm products are worth a try.

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Chau Tran

Price is definitely a pitfall but I wouldn't say "heavy". If a person is already working as a paid developer, I'd recommend getting WebStorm (not the All Products Pack) still as it is extremely cheap (16 cents a day for the first year -> 9 cents a day for third year onwards)

Plus, Jetbrains does have programs to offer free licenses for various categories.

VSCode is a great product. WebStorm is also a great product. However in my opinion, price should be the least of a developer's concern when compare the two.

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Keerthi • Edited on

To me it's the opposite. I ditched Jetbrains products and moved to VS Code. Never looked back. I code Angular, Golang, Java/Spring and occasionally Python. Much satisfied with VS Code.

I find VS code's keyboard short cuts and editing capabilities more powerful and easier to use and I'm far more productive in it. With its workspace settings.json and extensions.json it is easier to setup a workflow and automation that'll provide a consistent experience to everybody in the team. It's pity that you didn't discover it's capabilities and simplicity. With that comes a lot of power.

Even if my company pays for Jetbrains license I would happily pick VS code. To each his own. Well.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

Exactly, not here to convince anyone, I would urge people to use whatever works best for them.

VSC did just that for me, for a very long time.
It's mainly my need for testing and debugging these days that made me favor WebStorm else I probably wouldn't have switched.

What was your main point to switch?

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kpkeerthi profile image
Keerthi • Edited on

Not sure what the difficulty is in testing in vs vode. Jasmine, karma, Cypress, protractor work just fine. It lays out inline code hints with which you can kick off any or all or a set of tests in run or debug mode.

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

No difficulty, but WS has a cool way of doing individual tests inside a file, don't think i've seen that in VSC (or i'm not aware of it)

  • it has a great way of visualising snapshots and debugging tests.

Again, not here to say VSC is bad at it, for my use-cases (singular test in a case) it works better in WS.

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flawnson profile image
Flawnson Tong

Really like that you highlighted a bunch of great things about JetBrains IDEs, but honestly imho this is one of those things that comes down to personal perference :P

And for the record I ust JetBrains IDEs :)

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers Author

It sure does, it's with almost any tooling really.
I tried to highlight what works for me.

For some people other IDE's will be better and that's the cool part about it.

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clarity89 profile image
Alex K.

Another great thing about WebStorm is that it's simply super quick.

It is indeed quick for small to medium-sized projects. However once the codebase grows substantially it can become quite slow sometimes. Especially when there's more than language in the codebase, e.g. I use Goland for a large TS and Go codebase and when switching branches indexing takes ages.

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Deepak Kamat

I used to use Sublime Text for everything - for 7-8 years now, tried a few other editors like Atom, even VS Code in its early days but I found Sublime to be my friend.

But a few months back decided to start using VS Code for some projects and now I started liking it - I still feel it's a bit too cluttery but it gets the work done and the plethora of features come in handy for a lot of things. I use Sublime and VS Code interchangeably, VS Code where I am doing more of a whole project that involves a lot of good code related hints, like for example a project in Typescript, for simpler projects Sublime is still my friend.

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Vlajd

For me personally, I never liked having so many tools and features on my fingertips that I'll be unlikely to use anything soon. So I switch from Intellij→VSC→NVIM. I don't really miss any of these cool debug features provided by either the plugins or out of the box. Rider for C++ development is the only exception, as debugging huge C/C++ codebases is just straight up impossible using only vim. But for web, once you've set up Coc or something similar, my work output just feels way more reliable, even when working in bigger TS projects (for example) (or way too huge CSS files).

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lunule profile image
lunule

Well, no offense, but this seems to be an affiliate article, or simply a masked advertisement.

You couldn't mention one single feature that would be so stellarly better in Webstorm in comparison with VSCode.

Also, VSCode is free, but it offers an amazingly wide palette of various settings, customizations and extensions.

And this is an important point here - I can only speak for myself of course, but there are already tons of thing I have to pay for if I want to offer premium quality deliverables and support to my clients.

Why would I pay for something that's clearly of lower quality compared to VSCode?!
That's pure nonsense.

But congratulations for the uber-clickbait title. πŸ‘

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Chris Bongers Author

Well I could argue your comment is affiliated from a visual studio point of view.

Sorry for sharing my honest opinion about what I liked about switching to WebStorm.
I'm not stating anyone should switch, and even mention VSC is perfectly fine in most cases.

Seriously I'm writing daily content for people to enjoy and some of you think I do these things for money, it's just making me really sad πŸ˜…

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Victor Vincent

During my career I tried to switch from Storm to VSCode 3 times, giving it a 1 month trial each time. Always went back to Storm. One of the biggest pain point for me is Git. Code's Git integration/features is like 0 compared to Storm and it's UX is pretty weak also. Another thing is Search, you also mentioned. Besides those there are many tiny things that's just gives better UX for me overall using Storm.

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codeyStein

The same kinda happened to me, I switched from VScode to NeoVim a few months ago, and I have no intentions of going back. I realized how slow VScode was making my productivity way slower, and the program was also slow itself, I'm excited to hear your journey on switching from VSCode, good luck!

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kayis profile image
K (he/him)

I used PHPStorm and WebStorm for years, but I switched to VSCode.

VSCode simply has a bigger eco system and when new things come out, you can be sure that a VSCode extension exist for it. Same rason why I use JavaScript, when new tech comes out, chances are good that a way exist to interact with it via JS.

Also, with the latest trend in cloud IDEs (AWS Cloud9, GitHub Codespaces, etc.) I think most classic IDEs are a thing of the past anyway. Usually, I fire up one of these and don't even have something installed on my local machine anymore.

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Michal NovΓ‘k

I was a PhpStorm user for many years and I love it. About a year ago I started using VS Code regularly for my side project - just for fun, to distinguish between hobby and work. And it was fresh and fast.

As I learned more in VSC and the editor evolved, I was using VSC more and more. Also my work evolved, less in PHP and more in .NET, plus way more JS and TS. I configured debuggers for PHP and JS, so this crucial part is working nicely in both.

VSC doesn't do things as good as PhpStorm, but for me it's good enough to save a few bucks. That's because for the first time I'm seriously considering not renewing my PhpStorm subscription any more. The main thing I miss is in VSC is PHP refactoring (I found paid extensions only), which I don't do that often and thanks to perpetual license it's not like I won't be able to use it from time to time.

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Chris Bongers Author

Fair enough, it's all about what you need.
If VSC solves your problems I would also not bother spending money.

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Bangon Kali

When I use any Jetbrains product I also make it so that -xmx and -xms is 24576m because I've been using 32Gb and then nowadays 64gb RAM. Everything is very smooth and quick. The default ram allocation for their products are quite small.

intellij-support.jetbrains.com/hc/...