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Finding a job in 2020

jwp profile image John Peters Updated on ・1 min read

Tips for finding a new job in 2020.

One of the best resources for finding a job is LinkedIn. The reason is that recruiters live there.

They post openings daily, and if you hang out there daily; you will make plenty of contacts.

Present your best profile and continually improve it. Flip the 'Available and Looking' switch on, and wait for the calls to arrive.

1) Treat your job hunt as a full time job. Seriously, work 8 or 9 hours a day.

2) Take as many interviews as you can. This teaches you how to interview, what the current industry hot skill sets are, and also; it allows you to see different company cultures, some of which you'll like and some of which you won't.

3) From the interviews and posted job openings, learn the most in demand skills you found from interviewing. Pick just one to improve on and start studying.

4) Never allow rejection to affect who you are. Just chalk it up as a lack of skill.

You can always learn new things. Allow the rejection to be your motivator.

5) Practice coding skills daily.

6) Continually improve your resume. Resumes are like programs, they are never done.

7) Never sell yourself short. As far as you know, you are the best and only person a company can find.

One last tip... make sure all of your online profile pictures represent the business persona.

If you do these things you will get a great opportunity that you could have never planned or imagined.

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John Peters

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Discussion

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"Never sell yourself short. As far as you know, you are the best and only person a company can find"

I really like this state of mind, as long as it's only within the context of an interview/application. Otherwise it could cloud your judgement when it comes to consistently improving your skills, job preparation, or even your attitude on the job.

 

I had sold myself short for 20 years, not knowing how to compete in my field.

The end result was a stagnant skills set and salary. I had always continually learned new stuff but didn't know how to sell them. Companies are fine with you working only legacy things.