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Yes... you slowly lose your short-term memory knowledge of the language/tech stack/API/platform you use everyday.
Yes... you slowly use muscle memory of your IDE and the CLI
No... you build a stronger ability to make effective broad technical decisions
No... you develop the ability to decompose and prioritise large technical initiatives across a number of people

So the depth of your knowledge probably gets shallower, but the breadth of your knowledge, and certainly your influence, gets broader.

 

What do you think of going back to a developer role? Will you then be a better or worse developer?

 

I guess you will now be a better developer in terms of taking on more things and having a more holistic approach towards the product you would develop. You would now not just be waiting for requirements to come in but would suggest modifications to not just functionalities of the application but also the improvements in supporting roles, like CI/CD pipeline, cost estimations etc. I guess it depends on your definition of what a "good developer" is really.

*EDIT *: Above is again an assumption I am making keeping myself in the scenario you provided and how it would change things for me.

Would you always recommend a developer to take on the management role (it manager, team lead, or CTO) if he got the opportunity to do so?

It depends on what appeals to you as a person I guess. Being a CTO, architect, etc in an organization definitely gives your opinion more weightage in comparison to a junior developer due to the hierarchy that exists. You will be in a position to make a greater impact in a managerial role. So if that is what appeals to you then go for it. If you're not wanting to be in an organization, want to be the lone wolf, do freelance, write blogs, do podcasts, come out with tutorials, etc then just go crazy my dude :D The world is yours for the taking when you're your own boss :P

P.S. A life lesson: Beauty lies in the little details. Black and white are perfectly good regions on their own but life's a lot more interesting in the grey areas. :)

What does it mean in your post scriptum? I mean, that statement can be applied to all areas of work

 
 

Also can't you learn these skills being a developer?

 

Yes, in the same way you can learn a new language as an IT manager, team lead or CTO.

I'm not sure whether he really got time and practice for that

 
 
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