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Heroku

Heroku is a container-based cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS). Developers use Heroku to deploy, manage, and scale modern apps. Our platform is elegant, flexible, and easy to use, offering developers the simplest path to getting their apps to market.

Discussion

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Hello! I work for a fortune 50 company and a lead developer for the cloud team. We have had a few interns and converted from interns recently. The things my team looks for are knowledge of agile methodology (not experience, just understanding), javascript (debugging, dom structure, and callbacks on top of building blocks), css (bootstrap, flex box, less, scss),npm html, responsive web building and testing is a given. Any experience in js frameworks are a plus. So is any experience in writing test scripts/test driven development. Any experience with cd/ci is huge. Might be a little much, but its what we look for :)

 

What seems notable for its absence is any mention of front end frameworks like react or ember. Are you looking more for vanilla JS?

 

So not necessarily vanilla javascript itself, but when you know vanilla javascript itself, you are in a better place starting something like angular or reactjs. If that makes sense. We still code vanilla js, but those concepts apply to the frameworks.

 

I consider that this war of the frameworks (Angular vs React vs Vue vs Svelt.. etc ) it's wrong for the developers, because are learning the framework first, before the base of frontend.
What is the base?
Html Css and Js. After understand that, i consider that most essencial is learn TypeScript and any CSS preprocessor

 

This is a really good point! When I was starting out I tried to learn Ember and Bootstrap before I knew either JS or CSS well, and it really slowed my progress.

 

Certainly it would be essentials of understanding DOM-structure (HTML), using CSS (especially flexbox and grid) and of course JS at beginners level (arrays, DOM-manipulation and so on).

For the quick start you may learn Bootstrap: it will help you to build your first projects quicker.

 

"The essentials" seem to be up for debate... but if you break it down in terms of necessity then it speaks for itself. HTTP, FTP, HTTP (general idea of protocal), a history of what web documents are emulating and why, HTML (hit wall), CSS (hit wall), CSS (flex/grid), PHP (to help with componentizing HTML), PHP (hit wall), JavaScript... then - it's up to you. This book: Exercises for Programmers is languages agnostic - and it's set of challenges will very quickly outline what is "essential." If you understand that book, you can pick up Vue or Node on the job. Here's that larger thought process listed out in a post.

 

Semantic HTML. CSS.

The use of an appropriate naming scheme for classes, functions, directory and filename structure etc. I think is important.

Edit: How the DOM and cascade operates.

 

The holy trinity of web dev... Semantic HTML, CSS and vanilla JS ES+

 

CSS and JavaScript. No matter what platform or framework I've built on, CSS and JS have been invaluable tools. I don't even like CSS, and I still learned it, because it is that valuable.