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VIDEO ๐Ÿ“บ๐Ÿ“น Practical Web Scraping | Auto-Upload to DEV | Part 1 - Logging In

kaelscion profile image kaelscion Updated on ใƒป1 min read

Web automation has a lot of uses. But we know that: Rotten Tomatoes, travel sites, Scraping Hub, Hootsuite, etc all use 'em. And another relatively unknown company, Google does too. So what? What can a web scraper do that would help you, in any way, personally? How about auto-uploading blog posts? If you're interested in learning how to auto-upload blog posts to DEV (the example we're using in this video), watch the video below and follow along in the series that it begins!

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kaelscion

@kaelscion

I'm Jake Cahill. Lifetime Pythonista, web scraping and automation expert. Enjoy books. Love my wife, dog, and cat, and think AI and Julia are pretty nifty

Discussion

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I really appreciate that your show typos and looking things up in the video. So many tutorials edit that out and I think half the value in watching a video like this is learning other people's workflows and how they tackle errors and looking up information.

I am looking forward to part two!

 

Thank you so much! That's part of the reason that I started making tutorials on YouTube. I use YouTube all the time to learn new topics and it always makes me feel like crap when they type things in perfectly every time and never use reference materials. That is, until I talked to another YouTuber who told me they wrote the entire tutorial 10-15 times before filming to get that effect. That made me think: "if this makes me feel stupid, it must make others feel stupid." And making people feel inferior is a type of gatekeeping IMHO. And, while I don't think other devs on YouTube do that on purpose, I wanted to show what a real project build looks like so I screen capture as I go and edit extremely little on the screen capture. I feel it will make others feel better about looking stuff up. Plusil I don't hesitate to make light of myself because my #1 complaint about working with other developers is that, often, they take themselves way too seriously and I'm much more of a class clown. Thank you so much for your words of encouragment! It makes me even more excited to get to the next part!!

 

I second that comment - keeping in your mistakes can provide such value and also helps the viewer (including ourselves) realise it's not just us that runs into these things!

We even went through the effort to drag the "completed code" from the second screen to the screencast screen in our frontend crash course and explained that we aren't doing all this code by memory - and that they shouldn't need to either. Fun :D