Are you learning a new language in 2019? Share your story.

・1 min read

My next is Go. I've been having more "maker" than "manager" time recently, so getting back into prototyping potential new Semaphore features.

Ruby has been my go-to language for years, but when the use case is system software, it's hard to beat a tiny, self-contained, portable binary. Or a 10MB Docker image.

What about you?

DISCUSS (21)
 

As part of my perhaps too ambitious goals for 2019 I am going to attempt to get through 6 courses on Udemy. Among them are courses in Go and Rust. I am mainly a Ruby developer at work so I wanted to learn something for system programming as well.

 
 

Go is awesome! It was my first new language 2018. I made a game-prototype with it, and some smaller programs like a favicon-to-ascii-converter.

Also, end of last year I did a bit Elixir, and really liked what I saw! Did some advent-of-codes with it and went through Dave Thomas' course. Let's see if I'll have a use-case someday.

2019: Swift, Math/CS-Fundamentals, maybe Elm

This year started with Swift/Cocoa for me. I wanted to redo an Electron-App I made for image-perspective-correction natively. It took me much less time (as JS-dev) than the Electron-version and it's so much faster! It was fun to learn Swift and right now I'm going through a MacOS-Dev-course.

Additionally I really really need to work at least a bit on CS-fundamentals. There's a Math-for-Devs book I peaked into and I'm planning on working through it. I have an OK basic knowledge but I'm mostly self-taught.

 

Re. fundamentals, I'd recommend getting to know how the computer and operating system work from scratch. I've seen many newcomers who lack that knowledge hit a wall in terms of what problems they can solve and how much they can advance as developers. The work of Tanenbaum is a classic.

 

And thanks again, it's a very good book. I'm just at page 60 and already it helped connect lots of bits of knowledge I had previously to the bigger picture.

 
 

I'm actually going to stick with TypeScript, but learn it to a more in-depth level. I use TypeScript for my Angular projects, but I would like to be able to also create Node APIs in TypeScript. So that's what I'm looking to learn in 2019

 
 

Well I finished the last year learning flutter becuase I got bored using ReactNative. So Flutter uses Dart as programming lenguage so the last year I didn't have enough time to learn it.

Well in my 2019 trello todo list I've "Learn Dart" I bought a course in Udemy but the main goal is release my first app creatted with flutter.

 

Learning while having a project you're passionate about = success

 
 

I would like to learn Go or Rust, but struggle with what I'd use them for. I could do python but I object to its positional structure

 

Yeah, personally I’ve never learned a new language without a concrete project that I wanted to start with as soon as I get the basics.

 

Actually I've been reading a great article on here about Go and a companion chrome extension that might be just the ticket

 

I'm taking on Dart (Flutter to be exact) this year :) going to rewrite one of my existing React Native apps to Flutter to learn it

 

I'm still learning angular
Try to learn solidity

 

Learning Kotlin with Spring Boot while doing a side project with some work friends. Been working with Spring Boot Java for about 6 months now and Kotlin is a nice change of pace for a side project.

 

Precisely this year I don't want to learn any new language, I want to boost my current skills :)

 

That’s great! Anything you want to focus on in particular?

 

I don't really know yet, I only can tell that I want to improve my js world knowledge, better rest express apps and better and fast angular builds. Ah well, and finish college, 1 exam left. :)

Classic DEV Post from Dec 29 '18

What's your 🎉New Year Resolutions🎉 ?

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Let's learn together. ⛰ Semaphore CI/CD cofounder. @markoa on Twitter.