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WEB DESIGN: what’s a good fit if you DONT LIKE STYLING?

yobretyo profile image Bret ・1 min read

I’m running into, I really don’t like styling.
One container is this, another div is that..... oops, it dosnt add up right. OH WAIT, not that button radius or color, ACTUALLY, I do like that color.

What is a more precise part of web design? Php, Python, JavaScript, Kotlin, Java, ????
I like “seeing” what I’m doing, BUT, if it’s setup right with how you do things, then it’s ok when I can’t see it.
Watching videos, I like the concept of how Kotlin is used, Swift and also I do like python. I like the possibilities. But I don’t like styling.
Which is best to be “more precise” to what you do?

Discussion

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ericgeek profile image
EricGeek

Two things. If you want to avoid styling, it is possible to get jobs that don't involve styling. Larger web development teams are more likely to separate out the people generating the page from those styling the page. This is only a tendancy, as smaller shops don't have the staff to do that, and a one-man shop has one person to do it all.

The second is that if you just don't want to deal with styling, you can look into things like Bootstrap and such which basically take over the styling. More likely to work for small shops or personal projects as Bootstrap projects tend to look fairly similar to each other, but it's an option.

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yobretyo profile image
Bret Author

I don’t really like bootstrap, I like Material-UI or Vuetify. I’ve used Styled-Components with Framer Motion and they worked great together. I like defining things and making things work/connect together

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ericgeek profile image
EricGeek

Bootstrap was just what came to mind first as something that takes over the styling, and I didn't know what front-end frameworks you liked working with. Bootstrap can be used with just about any front-end framework. Vuetify takes over a lot of the styling as well, but only works with Vue, otherwise I would have recommended it as well.

Basically, if you're working in web development and don't want to deal with styling, you can outsource the styling to a different team or team member, though that isn't always practical, or you can outsource it to some kind of UI kit, which also isn't always practical.

The biggest issue with that is if your project requires a specific look or feel. This argues against Bootstrap more than Vuetify, as Vuetify seems more flexible.

For the most part, the back end technology doesn't really affect this. Most back end technologies allow for template driven design which allows for separation of code and style, and even those that don't usually don't force you to use inline styling, so you can have someone set up the stylesheet and then you apply the classes that the stylesheet expects.

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yobretyo profile image
Bret Author

Thank you! I like defining things more then styling. I can see that Vuetify has allot more options than Bootstrap.... Vuetify does have a CDN, I’ve used it before, but not in a Django project. I’ve used Styled-Components + Framer Motion in React, it works well and makes it seem like Vuetify with customization.

But, aspect wise, I’ve watched videos using Java and Xcode, I liked how the objects were defined and kinda styled at the same tome and it was organized.
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Styled-Components with Framer Motion, you can set a variable that a const defines and you can add it as motion={object} and it styles it without too much “inline”, I like that, but, overall going through the list of “what you can do” messes me up.

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n4n0gh profile image
n4n0

First you need to understand that websites are essentially just documents written in HTML. Every framework you can use nowadays will transpile your JSX or whatever into a static HTML file which the browser can interpret.
HTML should be constructed with semantical meaning. A <div id="article"> has no semantic meaning, <article> however does.
Constructing websites with the limitations of semantic HTML is almost impossible if you keep in mind that a layer of CSS will be added to add the visual uniqueness later on.
This is why we are currently drowning in a div-soup that means shit all but is very handy for getting layout sorted nicely on a screen.
I'd recommend you read and understand the documentation of whatever style framework you're working with (i.e. Bootstrap, Tailwind, et al) and get to know what class is supposed to do what. There will be no "this container is this, another div is that... oops, it doesn't add up right" moments once you truly understand what the hell you're doing.
And lastly, it doesn't matter if you write your website in PHP, Python, JS, Kotlin, Java or anything else because it all needs to render HTML in the end and doesn't necessarily influence your styling at all.