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The 3 most interesting Kotlin posts of May 2021

Jean-Michel Fayard πŸ‡«πŸ‡·πŸ‡©πŸ‡ͺπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¨πŸ‡΄
Weeks of programming can save hours of planning
・2 min read

Let me share with you 3 interesting articles from #kotlin from May 2021.

I follow here the example from @sandordargo for #c++, and like him, it's not a popularity contest, I add subjectivity to the list yet try not to include multiple articles from the same author.

This month, it's all about Jetpack Compose!


@zachklipp does a deep dive inside Compose reactive state model. He takes an historical look at how we used to write code with callbacks, what RxJava brought to the table and what questions were left open. He then shows how Jetpack Compose allows us to write fully reactive apps with less boilerplate and hopefully less cognitive overhead than we’ve been able to do in the past. Simple, clear code that is easy to read and understand will (usually) just work as intended. In particular, Compose makes mutable state not be scary anymore.


@tkuenneth has started a cartography of Jetpack Compose. It's not a tutorial on how to use it, but an exploratory approach of what Jetpack Compose is made of. What belongs to the runtime? What is in the compiler? What is inside the foundation?


So much for the theory, here goes some coding. Sebastian Aigner from @kotlin tells us how he built a small clone of the classic arcade game Asteroids with Jetpack Compose for Desktop, a port from JetBrains to MacOS/Windows/Linux. Impressively the code is only 300 lines of code and was written in one night!


Happy coding, feel free to share your favorite one in the comments.

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