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Madza
Madza

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What keyboard do you use?

Laptop user here, looking for solid keyboard options to upgrade.
What keyboard do you use and why did you choose the particular model?

Top comments (87)

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metalmikester profile image
Michel Renaud

I use a Kinesis Freestyle for my work laptop and a Freestyle 2 for my personal computer (iMac): kinesis-ergo.com/keyboards/freesty...

I used a Das Keyboard at home for about two and a half years but switched back to the Kinesis a couple of months ago when I developed problems in my right arm.

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feldev profile image
Félix Paradis

TLDR:

I use an Ergodox-EZ which I like better than my Dygma Raise even though the learning curve is MUCH steeper

Long version:

felixparadis.com/posts/quest-for-t...

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thejuju profile image
Julien Gabriel

Thanks for this feedback! I'm really looking to buy Ergodox-EZ
I'm currently using a Typematrix without letters on keys. So I know how to type without looking my keyboard, and also with one hand on each half of keyboard.
What kind of computer do you use ? Mac ? Win ? Linux ?

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feldev profile image
Félix Paradis

You're welcome!

I've been using a mac for the past 10+ years (might switch to Linux when my macbook pro dies though 🤔)
But, keyboard-wise, it doesn't really matter. Both the Ergodox-EZ and the Dygma Raise work well on the 3 major Operating Systems.

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thejuju profile image
Julien Gabriel

That's great then! The Typematrix is a pain to configure on MAC OS event with some app like Karabineer...

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g33knoob profile image
G33kNoob

anyone ue TKL for programing?
is it really nice ?

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szech profile image
Adrian C

TKL is the best layout! Ergonomics of keys + numpad + mouse are bad. Getting rid of the numpad solves this.
Get a separate numpad if you really need numbers.

TKL seems to be the minority tho. There was an article on Ars Technica about this and the TKL fans were outvoted :-/

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pilskalns profile image
Andžs

As a casual gamer, a year ago I got Logitech G Pro which is a TKL mechanical keyboard (MK)... it's nice, so nice for programming, Lightroom, web, emailing, command line, any kind of shortcuts... Even my GF (she's not geeky at all) admits that there is something into mechanical keyboard input feel.

Have you ever pressed down keys really hard and longer than normal because Ctrl+C didn't work as expected and you didn't knew it was your fat fingers or bug in software/OS? MK's work very consistently and accurately on any key while giving mechanical feedback. So your brain gets used to it and it gives this freeing typing feeling, like the fresh mountain air at 1-3km altitude.

But ever so often when dealing with the number inputs (Excel / bitrate / bandwidth / TFA / calculator etc.) I really miss full numpad even though use moue a lot and close proximity is nice feel as well. So, that's a tradeoff.

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Victor Samson

TKL is my favourite layout. I'm too reliant on arrow keys to get rid of them!

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g33knoob profile image
G33kNoob

how about inputing number? i think its a bit difficult for programing ?

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geoff profile image
Geoff Davis

I personally don't have an issue not having a numpad. I haven't used a keyboard with a numpad in years, and never while programming.

I find having numbers close to the letter and operator keys makes using those together a smoother experience.

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geoff profile image
Geoff Davis

Using one now. Yes, a TKL is perfectly suited to programming!

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Kay Kleinvogel

There are 2 keyboards I'm using. One for the office (open floor) and one for my home setup.

For the office I'm having the Logitech mx keys.
It's such a great keyword and it's not loud so I won't distract my colleagues.

For my home setup I'm having a razer black widow rgb with orange switches. Just such a nice feeling especially when there is nobody to bother with the sound.

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avalander profile image
Avalander

I've been using a Ducky One RGB with Cherry MX Red switches for the past two years. It works really well, it is easy on my wrists and it has some cool light effects.

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bbrewder profile image
Brian Brewder

Wow, lots of different keyboards here that I've never heard of. I'll have to check some of them out. For me, it's the Microsoft Sculpt Comfort Keyboard. The mouse is garbage (I just toss it), but the keyboard meets all my requirements.

  • Ergonomic keyboard - Easy on the wrists for long coding sessions.
  • Wrist support - Again, important to help preserve the use of my hands (it would be difficult to work without them)
  • Oversized [DELETE] key optimally placed - It's my most used key in this section of the keyboard.
  • Arrow keys in the standard configuration - Makes it easier to hit the keys without looking.
  • Numeric keypad - This is a must on a desktop keyboard for me.
  • Minimal size - I don't like the big, clunky keyboards. I wish they wouldn't bother with the media keys, but the MS solution is reasonable to me (it's a hard switch, I just leave it on my F-keys).
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jabawaka profile image
Jabawaka

Same here, may I add as a bonus point you can place the numeric pad to the left of the keyboard to enjoy extra symmetry and ergonomy!

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iamschulz profile image
Daniel Schulz

I've got a Logitech Craft and love it. The MX keys feels just the same and is way cheaper, so that would be my go-to option these days.
Disclaimer: I don't like mechanical keyboards.

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tavy315 profile image
Octavian Matei

I have Logitech MX Keys and I just love it :-)

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g33knoob profile image
G33kNoob

Seem good keyboard, but in my country the price $150 seem overpriced in taxes

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vforvova profile image
Vladimir Smyshlyaev

The previous year I decided to invest in Ergodox EZ (ergodox-ez.com). It was hard to get used to it while I had to all the time change between my office keyboard (Logitech K380) and the ergodox one, but since pandemic started it took a week to build layouts for myself and get used to it. Especially challenging was Cyrillic layout because there are not enough keys in the rows to place all the letters to their common places. Here what it has become: configure.ergodox-ez.com/ergodox-e...

But in the very end, there is a feature of the keyboard I love the most - it is ortolinear. I used to have pain in my left wrist because I bent it to the left following the placement of the keys, don't need to do it anymore.

The same team also builds Planck keyboards, those are more compact, cheaper (than ergodox but still expensive), still ortolinear but have a bit conceptual way of switching key layouts.

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snobbysteven profile image
Steven Doss

For gaming I use a Razer blackwidow.

For work I was just using the normal keyboard that came with my work computer but I started getting wrist pain so I picked up a cheap ergo keyboard that I found on sale for $30 (bestbuy.com/site/microsoft-ergonom...) until I can convince myself to spend the money on a Kinesis Advantage2.

I was all about getting the flashy keyboard for coding at first, but it's not worth messing up my wrists. I am only 27, I got a long time of programming ahead of me. I just want the most ergonomic thing I can get now.

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moopet profile image
Ben Sinclair

I use a cheap Tecknet keyboard (I think it's an earlier version of this one: amazon.co.uk/TeckNet-Mechanical-Ke...)
I got given it by someone who didn't like the clackiness of the blue-switch keys.

Pros:

  • very solid-feeling
  • comfortable keypresses
  • good quality, long, braided cable

Cons:

  • a little too clacky, yes
  • cable isn't removable
  • RGB that's in a fixed rainbow. People like it when they see my desk on zoom calls, but I really would prefer a simple pale backlight across all keys, and this isn't configurable apart from to make it flash like an 80s disco.

I'd like to upgrade to something with reds or browns that's missing the arrow-key section and has better lighting. I want lights like I see on my Macbook keyboard really.

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dosh profile image
John S. Kim 💬

These days, I use mostly default MacBook Pro keyboard as I'm always moving around the house.

But used to use Real Force in the past. Likes Happy Hacking Keyboard, but recently got this one referred by a team mate: ultimatehackingkeyboard.com

Haven't received it yet, but excited! :)

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theodesp profile image
Theofanis Despoudis

Gee 310€ for a keyboard? Are you serious?

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dosh profile image
John S. Kim 💬

Invest in violin for violinists
Invest in piano for pianists
Invest in sword for knights and samurais
Invest in keyboard for programmers (and monitors, memory, computer, extended storage, yati yata)

So yes, we are SERIOUS!

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geoff profile image
Geoff Davis

Never get into mechanical keyboards lol

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reyynerp profile image
Reyynerp

im using some sort of external and easily broken keyboard alike. but i used that for gaming.

im using laptop. but since my laptop can be easily overheated for no reason. i open the top cover and leaving the fans rotating around 7300 rpm.

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chxguillaume profile image
Guillaume Chx

Still on my k95 from Corsair MX red not the best to code but not only doing that on my PC :p

At work still have a cheap membrane one but will soon change with a new mechanical from keychron (k8) hope I'll appreciate it :D

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adrianskar profile image
Adrian Skar

coolermaster.com/peripheral/keyboa... The integrated numpad is helpful but sometimes I wonder if the S version (arrows only) would make navigation easier. Definetly not going back from mechanical.

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joshuacarmody profile image
Joshua Carmody

tl;dr - Corsair K68

I recently bought a Corsair K68, because I wanted a mechanical keyboard that would survive me spilling my drink on it. I've only had it a few days, but I'm pretty happy with it:

corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Produ...

My previous keyboard was the DAS Keyboard X50Q ( daskeyboard.com/x/x50q-rgb-mechani... ). That one was also fine, but it seemed...cheap in some ways. I had some frustrations with the software and configuration, and the keyboard itself was very light and tended to drift around my desk. The Corsair K68 is heavier and the software is more polished. The Corsair also has hotkeys to change the keyboard lighting effects and styles without using software, whereas the DAS Keyboard doesn't.

(Incidentally although both of these keyboards support a myriad of lighting colors and effects, I always set mine to solid white all the time. Though I may use the software to highlight hotkeys in certain programs in the future, it can do that).

Before that I had the Code keyboard ( codekeyboards.com/ ). It was fine. Nice and heavy, felt nice to type on. But no frills. No macros or lighting, no spill resistance. If that's all you want though, it's a good keyboard.

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