How do you organize source code on your computer?

I'd be curious to see how everyone organizes their source code.

Let's see some screenshots or terminal dumps of your set up.

Here's what I've been doing for the last 5 or 6 years:

Source code layout

I like to organize my code by what it's used for rather than by language.

I've been a freelance developer for about 20 years and inside of those folders are hundreds of projects ranging from Visual Basic 6 from the mid 1990s to more recent projects written in Flask, Rails and Phoenix.

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DISCUSSION (32)

Below is how my sources are organized (for personal codes)

  1. public sources - GitHub
  2. private source - GitLab
  3. Playground - throwaway

sources
(Please ignore the poo.💩 file.)


GitHub has another top level directories, "Docker", "Aspnet", etc by technology.

I don't differentiate much by languages though.
I've been using above set up last 3 years and been working great.

throwaway is where all my one-offs or test/useless code are located.

I have a different structure for work as I have to follow the conventions at work.

I had no idea you could use emojis in filenames.

var mind = "blown";

You can also search by emojis 😎.
search by emoji

This looks pretty crazy. Just learnt as well.

oh man this emoji discovery is pretty friggin awesome, such wow

Apparently POO is an OOP language.

  • Day job:
    ~/Projects/CompanyName/ProjectName

  • Personal serious side projects or regular open-source contribution:
    ~/Projects/Personal/ProjectName

  • Practice non-serious side projects:
    ~/Projects/Practice/TechnologyName/ProjectName

  • Some open-source apps/scripts that I use and tinker with or have to self-host:
    ~/Projects/Applications/ProjectName

  • One-off scripts and POCs:
    ~/Projects/tmp

I have a Prog folder where there are all my repos localy that are mainly scripts or stuff that later I move on /var/www where I have the webserver or my vagrant machines.
Compared to you I am a bit disorganized.

For contracts and courses I use folders on external drives just to be sure that they are backup with my Nextcloud instance.

Keep in mind, I didn't start out like this.

The legacy folder alone as of today has 102 projects. That directory structure was slowly built up over many years.

~/dev is where I dump everything since that's an easy path to cd to.

I should probably care more than this, but it works for now.

Exactly what I do. I let GIT handle everything for me.
The only exception: In dev is a directory called Clones, and as the name tells: I Dump all the cloned public repositories in here.

Most of my projects are in a ~/Projects dir. I have a bunch of shell scripts in an another dir that does not make much sense (~/Other/Scripts)... I should move this dir but it has been there for years so... it's tradition now I guess 😀

I try to keep my ~/Projects dir tidy by removing any project that I'm not actively working on, since most of them are either on GitHub or my Gitea instance anyway.

~/Projects
    |- archived
    |- ongoing
    |- tutorials

ongoing is where I have the projects that I'm currently (or I've reasonably recently been) working on.

archived is where I move my projects after I abandon them. I try to be honest with myself and move projects from ongoing to here when I haven't worked on them in a few weeks and it's unlikely that I will take them up in the next few days. Also, sometimes I move projects from archived to ongoing if I decide to resurrect them.

tutorials is where I store the code I write following tutorials. I have a special consideration for those because usually when I'm learning something new and I follow a tutorial, I create a project with all the examples and stuff, that is handy to review when I'm working on a project with that stuff.

I'd like to say I'm organised but I'm actually quite scrappy. I'll go so far as to make a directory called work or something, but that's about it.

One thing you do I don't understand is have a directory called github. I wouldn't do that unless I was working on the code for github :) Other than that, everything I do is version controlled and I don't care what company provides remotes for it.

The github/ folder is dedicated to open source projects, not necessarily all projects that happen to use git (2 different things).

I could probably rename it to opensource/ but in this case, 100% of my open source work is on github.

Normally I throw everything in a development folder on any machine I'm working on.

Not every project is on every machine, these are just my desktop projects.

listing

One folder for one project. My mobile projects are on the MacBook.

Private projects go on Bitbucket, public projects go on GitHub.

Interesting to see diff. structures :D

In my case, a high-level structure contains each company and own projects under "personal".
And inside that, each project folder.

EG:
~/Projects/personal
~/Projects/companya
~/Projects/companyb
~/Projects/companyb/projectabc

Inside each project folder, also some structure, but can vary depends on the technology used:
EG:
~/Projects/companyb/projectabc/_DOCS - Project documentation, dumps, csv files, whatever needed.
~/Projects/companyb/projectabc/www - root

  • ~/CompanyName/ProjectName # Day Jobs
  • ~/Customer/CompanyName/ProjectName # Legacy Jobs
  • ~/Prototype/ProjectName # My Experiments
  • ~/GitHub/ProjectName # Downloaded Projects
  • ~/bin/ScriptName # My Own CLI Scripts
  • ~/Tutorial/ThemeName # Courses
  • ~/Documents # Contracts
  • ~/Downloads # Unprocessed Downloads
  • ~/Dropbox # Shared Configurations

I inserted some directories into CDPATH for easy use.

For coding projects I have to directories:

  • ~/Projects/
  • ~/Experiments/

Most of the projects in both directories are Python projects and under version control, so am not grouping them more granularly.

I've had many organizing rules among the years, now I'm back at folders per main project, because I'm learning and switching a lot.

img

I removed all my old projects (windows and php), and I started a clean slate, on a new laptop.

I have a Developer folder in my home directory.
I put all my code into the Developer folder. No other folders have project codes.
Folder name of the project will be the same as git repo name (only lowercase and dashes. no underscores).

I use GitHub for public sources and GitLab for private sources.

I have same structure for work

I like the idea of having everything on my home.

(~ is where ❤️ is)

Any kind of ~/Developer or ~/Projects would be a good fit for me. However, in the last year I settle on ~/Code. And since then I store all my repos on that folder. And I try to keep only projects that I am working on. I use GitHub, GitLab and Bitbucket for store all of them remotely.

I have three exceptions though. First, my dotfiles repo is at ~/.dotfiles. Second, a spells repo is at .spells which contains some shell scripts.

The third exception is anything that I might use for learning purposes. I store those at ~/Desktop.

~/code/fun/[project]
~/code/work/[client]/[project]

thiiiiis is so fantastically helpful to read, had not even occured to me in much detail previously. thanks Nick! and to all of you who have thrown in on this discussion, this has been exponentially more helpful for me to your responses in context. y'all are great!

Because we use a project management software at work. I break it down by the following:

  • What department is the user? (I work in a college).
  • What is the Project Management Number?

I started using Git for changes, but I should be getting back to using it more regularly than I have.

Due to the limitation of windows path length (260) and an insane vendor, my source is at C:[source_control_project]

All my projects are on ~/ except for future pull requests on ~/Forks.

well, I Want It That Way - Backstreet Boy

I have everything under one directory and then all arraged by client/project/

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Nick Janetakis
I'm a full stack web developer who has been freelancing for the last 20 years. I write about everything from development to production and have video courses on my site!
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