What is your job title?

・1 min read

I'm always fascinated by how many different job titles there are out there. I've a quite a few myself and I'd love to see what you actual title is and how well you think it relates to your work!

For me, I am a Level 3 Software Engineer. I focus on front-end development with React, but dip into Rails every now and then. I think this title is a pretty good representation of what I actually do, but I don't believe that there is a standardization around the levels - if someone knows of one, I would love to hear about it!

Have a great weekend folks!

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DISCUSSION (21)
 

My title is Director of IT. It's meaningless, as it says very little about what I do specifically. I'm the sole technical person at a non-profit, doing everything from PC deployment to developing apps with React. I got my title when, about one week into the job, my boss came to me and said: "We're printing your business cards. What do you want your title to be?" It was just the first thing that came to mind.

More recently, another person in my org referred to me conversationally as the tech savior. I'm lobbying to make that my new title!

 

Yeah, I find that titles are meanless especially for jobs where work may not be related to the title you hold.

 

Software Test Engineer, though I don't care for the extra weight engineer gives everything. I don't have an engineering degree and I have no clue how to pass an engineering interview with algorithms and Big O and stuff, so why am I an engineer?

At least that denotes I automate things rather than just Quality Analyst which sounds more like clicking buttons. I tell the computer to click buttons for me. Totally different.

 

When I applied for my job, it was for a PHP/MySQL Developer. When I signed my contract for it, it was PHP/Apex Developer (Apex being the language used in Salesforce). My colleagues found out a little while later I was good with .NET and just became a Developer.

Skip forward a few years, I became an Account Manager/Developer and a year after that, Lead .NET Developer.

The irony of my role is that while I do a lot of .NET development, I also am still doing a lot of PHP work, I do frontend and backend development, database design and I help manage our internal infrastructure.

I try and get involved with lots of business decisions too and I joke that my role should actually be Chief Operating Office.

 

Contract says "VP of Engineering", which is a reasonable approximation of what I('m supposed to) do. That said, who really cares, I generally use "Engineering Lead" or "Lead Developer" or "(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻)" when describing my role.

 

What appears in the company's internal site for my role is Web UI Developer and then Jr Adv. Which is kinda weird given that I'm currently on a project that has a bunch of PHP5 scattered all around even for the UI

 

Depending on where you look in our system I am one of three titles. Software Engineer, PHP Software Engineer, or Software Developer.

In actuality I am a full stack software engineer/developer that also does some backend non-web systems work.

 

Hmmm... I think the reason there's a level, it just means depth in the area of specialisation & service support.

As developers, I doubt anyone is taught this in CS courses unless your planning to be a network engineer or IT infrastructure manager.

This comes from the playbooks of IT service management for IT support services in corporate culture.

Following a standard called ITIL to be compliant for operation service contracts with corporate customers aka big companies.

My job title is a Full Stack Developer, nowadays I focus on building internal or external APIs for my backend and create MVP using Python in both Flask & Django for my customers that we pitch to.

 

Depends on who you ask. In practice I'm the founder of my company. With my current main client/source of income I hold the role of a senior PHP developer. It's not necessarily a title I agree with because I don't think my knowledge is deep enough to be considered senior, nor do I think I am old enough/have been working long enough for it. But hey, they can call me code monkey for all I care 🤷‍♂️

 

Mine is Data Scientist but we typically also append Software Engineer since that's a bit more accurate of a description of what we do. The "official" term is what we've been given by our parent/acquirer company to distinguish us from their core development team since we're involved with more experimental/exploratory solutions to problems.

 

Application Developer at my full time role. Founder and Developer for Amazon Seller tools Open Source Project

 

I work in technology (not as a developer at the moment). The way my company handles it is interesting, I think. The engineers don't really have defined job titles since we need to be flexible. So, depending on what customer I am working with or who I am talking to I am either a Senior Systems Engineer, Senior Networking Engineer, or Cloud Architect. All of these match with what I do.

 
 

My title is Senior Front End Developer. I think it's fairly accurate, although I've been learning a bit more about the backend side of things recently as well.

 

Communications Director. My job is basically PR and Marketing, but I also handle pretty much all website related stuff, too.

 

My title is actually CEO of a start up company we call it hulu-tech the name might change , but still we are a start up still so i am trying to find clients still but i was supposed to be the CEO!

 

it says "SENIOR CONSULTANT" in the Org-Chart, but I always add "Front-End" in Communication, since most other consultants are Java-Devs and Agile-Coach-Master-Owners.

 

Officially, my title is Programmer, but I do very little programming. It's more indicative of where my skills lie, compared to my co-workers in my department, I believe.

 

I'm a software/product developer and Bug Queen.

Guess which one I created for myself and the company decided to roll with it :D

 

Front End Developer III, though most of the other devs just call me the "UI Guy" and think my sole purpose is to make things pretty.

 
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