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Edison Ade
Edison Ade

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Will Deno replace Node js ?

Discussion (9)

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vonheikemen profile image
Heiker • Edited

I say no. They only way to do that is by being 100% compatible, and as far as I know that's not a goal for Deno.

Another thing, the size of node's ecosystem is too big to be replaced. The internet told me years ago that node was going to "kill" PHP and yet here we are. PHP is still out there.

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sergix profile image
Peyton McGinnis

I agree, the size of the ecosystem is far too large to suddenly change now. It took forever for even basic hosting platforms to support NodeJS. I expect it will be a while before Deno really gets adopted as well.

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rhymes profile image
rhymes
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buzzedison profile image
Edison Ade Author

Thanks for sharing. Will do. Stumbled on Deno today. Everyone is talking about it.

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Jacob Colborn

I think Deno will become more popular and we will start seeing big things being created with it. We may even see a few things migrate to it. But, Node.js has such a large usage and ecosystem I don't see how we can get rid of it. It would be like getting rid of Wordpress or PHP. Those things are still here after many, many years of Node.js being available. I do look forward to learning more about it in the next few weeks and maybe even creating an application with it.

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Tharun Shiv • Edited

Anything is possible in the programming community. It would be easier to answer if your question had a period included in it, as to whether you're asking about the current period or the future. πŸ™‚

As of current scenario, Deno is young. There are a lot of pros of using Demo in a project when compared to Node.js . Keeping this aside, it is not as easy as we imagine to change huge applications from Node.js to Deno or any other library for that matter.

So it will take time for the community to start understanding, using, and replacing Node with Deno. And also Deno might not be in a position to provide all the features that Node provides us with.

Deno courses and crash courses will be out, people will learn them and get used to it. Start-ups will start using it in their products. And then we will see a rise of Deno in the production slowly, hopefully.

So end note is: Node.js is going nowhere, it is as strong as how it was last week

ThanksπŸ™‚

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James Ingold

It's really hard to usurp things with the network effects that NodeJS has, I don't think the Pros on the Deno side are compelling enough for replacing NodeJS in an application right now but we'll certainly see it used in greenfield projects.
Definitely looking forward to following the progress and using the lambda standard library.

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Michael "lampe" Lazarski

Define replace?
Will Deno be maybe the first choice if you start a new project in a few years? Maybe. Maybe only for startups or maybe only for big companies with the time and manpower to developer all the tooling.
Will NodeJS code be used in production and maintained in 10 years? I bet on it. Mainframes from the 80s are still a thing.
Will we maybe see something else then deno and nodejs in 5 to 10 years? Sure, maybe we will use only wasm and write everything in future-language-which-we-don-t-know-yet

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John Peters

Too late. The size of NPM prevents an intruder. Now Microsoft owns it and they excel at creating compilers. Dependency issues will most likely vastly improve in short order.