Who's looking for open source contributors? (July 1st edition)

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Monthly Dev Open Source Software (4 Part Series)

1) Who's looking for open source contributors? (April 30th edition) 2) Who's looking for open source contributors? (May 31st edition) 3) Who's looking for open source contributors? (July 1st edition) 4) Who's looking for open source contributors? (August 2nd edition)

Find something to work on or promote your project here.

Please shamelessly promote your project. Everyone who posted in previous months is welcome back this month, as always.

Happy Coding!

Photo by Fezbot2000 on Unsplash

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Well, I have already posted a call for help in this post: Contributors wanted for unusual project

But some advertisement is always good, so:

Contributors are wanted for the AsmBB project.

No doubt, this is the fastest and lightest web forum engine, written entirely in assembly language and using FastCGI for even faster communications with the web server.

The project is free and open source, distributed under the EUPL license. (which is copyleft license compatible with GPL)

While I can write and optimize the back-end of the engine, my skills in the HTML/CSS/JS are pretty weak, so some skilled front-end developer and designer are highly needed in order to make the front-end as good as the back-end of the engine.

Of course, assembly language developers are also welcome, because there are many features that can be implemented in order to make AsmBB even better.

For everyone this is a chance to work on an really unusual project, learning non-conventional development tools and making the performance priority number one!

 
 

Great. In what area you want to help? If it is the front-end, simply clone the repository and browse the www/templates/ directory in order to get some idea about the current state of the project.

Useful reads:

How to install the engine - you will probably need a working local instance of the engine. The article is about installing on VPS, but the same directions can be used for local web server as well.

The template engine specification - the basis of the front-end is the template engine. Here is more or less full description of the syntax.

The contributions model - here is described how to make changes and submit them to the project.

 

I'll kick things off with a bit of a different post.

Out of necessity, I forked and upgraded a Ruby API wrapper for the Zoom API (link to docs). I only needed a subset of the API for the project I was working on at the time so I only implemented a portion of it. The rest of the API is not implemented but a solid template for building endpoints is established. This pattern has made it very beginner friendly and I am happy to coach and provide constructive feedback in PRs.

GitHub logo hintmedia / zoom_rb

Ruby API Wrapper for zoom.us API

zoom_rb CircleCI Maintainability Test Coverage

Ruby wrapper gem for zoom.us API (currently v2)

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'zoom_rb'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install zoom_rb

Usage

require 'zoom'

Zoom.configure do |c|
  c.api_key = 'xxx'
  c.api_secret = 'xxx'
end

zoom_client = Zoom.new

user_list = zoom_client.user_list
user_list['users'].each do |user|
  user_id = user['id']
  puts zoom_client.meeting_list(host_id: user_id)
end

begin
  user_list = zoom_client.user_list!
rescue Zoom::Error => exception
  puts 'Something went wrong'
end

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Added some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request



 

Here's a project that I think is cool to be seen at least: github.com/hpez/tunegraphy
It's a python code that, simply put, turns audio into pictures. Check it out and if you have any ideas or could make a contribution (performance-wise, algorithmic, etc.) create an issue or a pull request!

Classic DEV Post from Apr 2

Explained: How does async work in Rust?

Rust decided to not include an async runtime. Therefore the developer is left with the choice of an appropriate crate to make async work.

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