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Jonathan D Herring
Jonathan D Herring

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I am done. No more...

I have been doing the same thing over and over since I graduated from a coding bootcamp February 2020. The shotgun approach to applying to jobs, just spray and pray. After months and hundreds of rejections I am now officially done.

I even made a web scrapper that would help me apply to around 50-100 jobs a day. I have stopped spamming my resume all over town and decided to show potential employers and co-workers what an great addition to their team I am.

What am I doing now?

I will be making content that will showcase what I am learning and currently working on, in addition to asking the community's input and advice. I will focus on learning a deeper understanding of my main language, python. One of my main goals to contribute to and open source project. Being able to show that I can learn the code base on a project and then add value to that project is worth more than anything I can say on my resume.


I am currently studying algorithms on HackerRank and for fun I find CTFs on TryHackMe Also some Cyberpunk 2077 when I need to let off some steam.


Albert said it well but Farcry definitely made a more lasting impression on me.

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Top comments (15)

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zeedu_dev profile image
Eduardo Zepeda

Shotgun approach doesn't work. Put yourself in the shoes of the company you're applying to. They are not hiring you to make you a favor or to pay you money, they have a need to be fulfilled, mostly related to money. You have to be the solution to that need, and for that you'll need to research a little bit about the company before applying.

For example: You mention that you're a beer brewer and that you study philosophy

Apply to companies related to beer or music, help them solve their problems, the same problems that you had when you worked in those fields, you should know them much better than your competition, you will have the advantage over those that focused only on software. Focus on solving companies needs, not in spamming resmues

Also, don't use the same resume for every company, customize it according to the company you're applying to.

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khangnd profile image
Khang

Most practical and easy-to-do piece of advice in my opinion 👍

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maks_yadvinskyy profile image
Maksym Yadvinskyy

Don’t loose hope too quickly. It takes years to become good at programming. I’ve been programming in my free time for almost 10 years and still feel like I have a lot to learn ahead of me.

do you have any projects that you worked on through the entire year that you can show off? What persuaded you to become a developer in the first place? hopefully it’s not the money.

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ivan_jrmc profile image
Ivan Jeremic

Why search for jobs? Create products!

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alimobasheri profile image
MirAli Mobasheri

Love is the pearl, I'm the diver and the programming world is the sea. I plunged into it, now let's see where I shall emerge.
(This is a poem originally written by Hafiz, the great Persian poet, and changed by me. Of course programming didn't exist then, but the interest and the courage is still among us.)
Wish you good luck, Mr. Herring! ✌✌

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adam_cyclones profile image
Adam Crockett 🌀

Hello, maybe try ForgeRock? Since we are founded in beer, and I know atleast the UK office brews, it's important... You might find we have some positions worth a look as we are growing alot at the moment and we have 11 years of history in security and Identity behind us as well. The US has the main offices too. My interviews where fair and human so like I say take a look.

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neverl3gend profile image
Alex Garcia

I think you're going about this the incorrect way. Some people go into coding boot camps and leave it with an amazing experience but sometimes they lack one thing... which is NetWorking!!!. In my honest opinion, you will find a job with no problem (even though you're struggling a bit). You're just going to need to continue to build projects and contribute to other projects as well but do not forget to network with people. Since COVID is still a thing try to find virtual events, talk to people, sometimes you'll find recruiters at these events. Go on Eventbrite or something similar to that and find virtual Python events. Also ... why not freelance? Be your own boss? OR find a job in the meantime and network through the company. There are so many ways to get jobs as a developer, but a lot of people just go through the regular application process. Get creative YOU GOT THIS!!!!!!!

I'm not bashing you, I just pushing you into success. I think it's way too early to toss in the towel. I 100% believe in you, Jonathan, keep us posted on your journey!

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César O. Araújo

Jonathan, I think you should focus on leaving footprints of yourself on the internet. Write articles, contribute to Open Source projects, ask if people want help with some project. These things are pretty much details but they do work!

Leaving these footprints behind means that you will be noticed by people. It's a matter of time and I hope you don't give up! :)

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jamesdrysdale profile image
JamesDrysdale

I sympathise with the difficulty of job searching too. I've been looking for work following my graduation from my software development course for months, to no avail. Yet. My approach has been a little like yours. A bit scattergun. I've had some interviews but keep losing out to more experienced candidates. Like you, I'm adjusting my approach.

Hopefully 2021 is the year we secure the job of our dreams. Thanks for sharing and good luck.

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Tomaž Vinko

I’m in professional software business for over 20 years now and there are still many ups and downs. I guess like in every business.. there are many surprises, negative and positive.

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern

Best of luck. You’ll crack this.

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chinedu profile image
chinedu | ddevguys

Don't lose hope! Am cheering for you!!!

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mrkbr profile image
Mario Kober

I do a lot of web coding and have sometimes more inquiries than I can handle. Companies around me are searching for good developers all the time. Where are you searching?

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Jonathan D Herring

Mostly backend if I had a choice. But I am open to learn anything.

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Mehmed Duhovic

I believe that you are struggling because of the current bussiness climate - the uncertain future definitely adds to that. Just keep on grinding, and study in the meantime!