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Ben Halpern
Ben Halpern

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What size company do you work for? What's that like?

Top comments (76)

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gablaroche profile image
Gabriel Laroche

We're over 4000 in total, but we are only 30 in our office and we don't have a lot of contact with the other offices except for Windsor and Montreal, so it really feels like a small company with all the great benefits of a big company.

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Mohammed Samgan Khan

lucky you...

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern

What kinds of big company benefits exactly?

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gablaroche profile image
Gabriel Laroche

like great insurance, job security, really big and interesting projects. Even if I like playing with multiple disciplines like web design and back-end development, I'm nowhere near as good at that stuff than I am at front-end development, so I can focus on my job and rely on my great teammates that are way better at this than me. In short, we have a lot of resources and that's pretty nice.

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Ken Flake

15 - 25-ish people. A startup. Codegum, Inc.

Much like @danielw said, it's quite a privilege to get to do (almost) everything.
But it's hard. 😂 But it's part of the process. So it's fun.

And you learn, slowly, the art of adapting to the different technologies. I guess that's what's important.

And it feels like I recommend it now for people starting on their software development journey.

Start small, and work to learn.

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Andrew Chou • Edited on

Small startup, with 12 people total once tomorrow comes (Consider). It's definitely challenging for me since it's essentially my first full-time role since graduating. Involvement in a lot of different areas of the product provides many opportunities for growth, which I'm lucky to have so early in my career. I personally appreciate the smaller team size because it feels more manageable to communicate with and learn from my peers :)

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Carlos Trapet

Same, 5 devs, 12 people in total. Recently moved from a huge company and I must say, start-ups all the way! :)

PS: Whoever thought of that wiggly line that moves with you while you scroll on your /company page is a design genius

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gene profile image
Gene

Checked out the startup! Looks really cool.

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elliot profile image
Elliot

Working at a startup as a first full-time job sounds like a good idea. You learn a lot right off the starting line!

Cool startup, and wow, that's a pretty landing page.

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msamgan profile image
Mohammed Samgan Khan

Mine is a startup, like 50 60 people. Its ECOM based. ourshopee. It's a bit challenging as the maximum code is legacy but its fun.

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Evaldas Buinauskas

Startup but code is legacy already? 🙄

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Mohammed Samgan Khan

I joined recently. its 3.5 years old, in core PHP. Trust me when you see the code it feels like an ancient manuscript.

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orkhanfarmanli profile image
Orkhan Farmanli

I've been in such a situtation too. We ended up writing everything from ground.

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msamgan profile image
Mohammed Samgan Khan

I proposed the same but the proposal was brutally rejected.

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gene profile image
Gene

Core PHP is not something to worry about if it functions the way it was intended. It may seem nice to re-write everything from the ground but for a business perspective that's a big risk. That usually happens when the company grows and have enough budget for the R&D division.

There's always room for improvement!

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msamgan profile image
Mohammed Samgan Khan

yaa that's the issue we are facing. the time and money.

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Omar Elbaga

But the truth is: php just works. It's been running WordPress for decades.

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orkhanfarmanli profile image
Orkhan Farmanli

PHP is good. People try too hard to hate PHP while it's getting improved year by year.

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Mohammed Samgan Khan

I am a PHP developer. It's not the language, it's the people not using it as it should be used. The problem lies there only.

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msamgan profile image
Mohammed Samgan Khan

PHP is cool. Its the people implementing it are with issues. Not doing what should have done.

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orkhanfarmanli profile image
Orkhan Farmanli

Exactly.

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tiffany profile image
Tiffany White

LARGE. They're multi-national and have employees all over the world. Can't count how many tbh as I'm starting on the 15th

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Arswaw

I'm in the same boat, although I start tomorrow.

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tiffany profile image
Tiffany White

Good luck!!

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sm0ke profile image
Sm0ke • Edited on

Startup. One man show.

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Jaimie Carter

Whats your startup?

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sm0ke profile image
Sm0ke

appseed.us/
Automation, Dev Tools, Boilerplates.

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jamonjamon profile image
Jaimie Carter

Wow. That's a really cool idea. How are you coming running this? Does it keep you super busy?

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sm0ke profile image
Sm0ke

We write over & over the same piece of code among projects.
IMHO, we need to automate at least this layer.

On top of providing stable & tested boilerplates with UI integrated, I have some tools to parse and convert Plain HTML themes to javascript, Python or Php apps.

I'm researching a lot to make this happen.
A lot of R&D involved but is challenging & rewarding.

Is 24/7 job :)

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spidergears profile image
Deepak Singh

Small Startup, Eloquent Studio, less than five people. Work is fun and intense.
Being so small in terms of employee size also means everyone has to play multiple roles and keep the shit together always.

Appreciation from client and other members just make it more awesome.

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Shad Mirza

I can understand, I'm also in a similar situation. On paper, I'm front-end developer but in actual, I'm making the backend, APIs, workflow. I even did the UI work of two apps.

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Niko Heikkilä

12 years old startup that has grown into a 50+ employee strong company completely owned by a large payment solutions company Nets.

Oh yeah, there's a huge amount of legacy code from the last decade. It will never go away easily.

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elliot profile image
Elliot

2! This summer my friend and I are making websites for clients, and writing some interactive articles.

We just finished our second client website, which went really well. We loved working with the website's owner and had a great time working with them.

Writing articles is really exciting and difficult. It's such an open ended task, I'm learning a lot about taking a creative project from start to end within a small team.

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emma profile image
Emma Goto 🍙

I saw you interned at Google, are you planning on going back to working at a company or do you think you want to continue on with freelancing?

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elliot profile image
Elliot • Edited on

This question is something I'm trying to figure out myself. I'm not sure I have any concrete thoughts on it yet. I still have to finish university.

Sorry for the somewhat vapid response lol. Let me get back to you.

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sourabh2k15

I interned at Yahoo! last summer in the Sunnyvale office. It's at least 7000 people crammed in those 5 buildings with a central cafe. I used to eat all 3 meals at the office, best experience ever! I met some amazing engineers, learned a lot and had a blast. My team was 20 people which was a subdivision of 100 on a single floor with open office layout which helped me interact with all team members and gather information for my tasks. We used to play foosball everyday and go out for team lunches etc

They also have the bay just behind the office and I would go for a walk on the trail frequently. Yahoo! ( then Oath and now Verizon Media division ) has a strong engineering culture.

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Daragh Byrne

All my long term jobs have been in relatively small organisations - right now it's around 35. I've been through a few startup sized operations, a couple of two-man shows and so on. I did work for a University once but in a small department.

I like small - you need more of an appetite for risk as things can be volatile, but you get to be involved in things and if you're lucky, see them take off and grow.

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Shad Mirza

It's a startup with 9 people in total. 3 people in tech team:
My senior => He is leading the team and working on websites, mostly php work.
Me => RN developer taking care of all the mobile application development.
My colleague => she is a junior backend developer, she is making the APIs. I'm currently instructing her in that work.
So yeah, it's fun but there is too much workload.

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wolfhoundjesse profile image
Jesse M. Holmes

I work for a company of 60, and just three years ago the number was closer to 6. In other words, we've been experiencing dramatic growth, and it comes with all kinds of challenges. When I arrived last October, much of the code base had never been looked over on site, and I questioned what I had gotten myself into. Now we have new developers, and we've been able to add some navigation to this rocketship.

Also, a 20-year-old company will come with some things you'll just have to ask for insider knowledge to understand. When you find a column in an old table that is named something like unused_field_1, it's best to ask the person who's been around from the beginning to tell you a story (and the stories are always great!).

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Jean-Michel Plourde

We are 35. The company is 16 years old. I've been there for like 3 months. We are hiring 10 new developers in the coming weeks.

I've worked for government and one of the biggest aluminum transformer in the world.

I definitely prefer smaller company because there is a real sense of accomplishment and fulfilment. If the project takes longer or the tools aren't on par, I prefer addressing it than putting more money and just waiting. We all know each other, do some activities on and after office hours (not too much, just enough). Feels like a big family where everyone looks after others. Even if I have bosses, they don't feel like bosses and they let employée take the decisions that suits their and their project needs.

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crimsonmed profile image
Médéric Burlet

For my part I work in a IT service startup Pixium Digital and we are about 10 in our Singapore office and opening a new office with 3-4 people in Nice, France. Having worked in a big company before I was tired of all the politics and huge chain of commands which sometimes can leave you stuck waiting for days. Working in this startup has been an amazing experience!

  • Got to learn a lot of new tech as everyone has to contributes on projects
  • Had the chance to learn many new things since we work in many different areas of IT
  • Having open space offices eases communication ( I can talk to my boss directly)
  • We can easily organize company events where everyone can come and space isn't limited. (try hosting 300 people events at a restaurant)
  • My boss is always open to new ideas which makes it easy to suggest trying new things.
  • One of the things I love the most is if I show interest and dedication my boss will not hesitate to try and ask more of me. (giving me my own team, project etc)

Startups are always tricky as the atmosphere can be either very toxic or very amazing. But for my part I am very happy I decided to travel half the world to be in Singapore at Pixium Digital.

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