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How did YOU learn Ruby?

deciduously profile image Ben Lovy ・1 min read

So, there's a chance I might need to get myself up to speed with Ruby (for real, and for quick), and even a smidgen of Rails and/or Sinatra.

I read why's poignant guide a long time ago. I also worked through some of Michael Hartl's Rails Tutorial, but this was back in Rails 4 days.

I've been working with JavaScript, TypeScript, C++, and Rust enough to feel I sort of understand what OOP means, but I know that Ruby takes a page from the Smalltalk book of object orientation . It ain't kid's play anymore, we're really oriented around objects here.

I have heard Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby by Sandi Metz is a good resource, and I am planning to pick up a copy. I also plan to translate some existing web backend work in a variety of tools to Rails 6. How else would you, Ruby expert, go about getting yourself back up to speed?

(p.s. job. more after the break.)

Discussion (26)

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Ben Halpern

Ruby is a scripting language at its core. One command after another. Almost brutally simplistic.

I’d recommend opening up IRB and typing some commands. It’s actually pretty close to coding in the environment.

Ruby is sort of object oriented, sort of functional, and has a few ways to do the same thing most of the time. It’s a bit of a free-for-all.

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JoshuaWoods

Sololearn and Treehouse now im working througfh some Middleman and Sinatra

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Ben Lovy Author

Sounds like a blast, honestly.

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Ben Halpern • Edited

It's so much about personal taste, but I really love how much care has gone into the language. It's a language that is more art than science and there are plenty of folks that find it distasteful.

But if it "fits your brain" it really is a blast.

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Ben Lovy Author

I see some Ruby in DEV - "Matz is nice, so we are nice"

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David Wickes

MINASWAN 👍

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Peter

I recently switched back to developing using Ruby on Rails and it’s just been pure joy. The best way for me to relearn has always been opening up my editor and plugging away. Browse through the official documentation, build, and have fun. :)

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drew

Hey Ben,

I've been learning Ruby lately. I'm using a course on Udemy The Complete Ruby on Rails Developer course, and the Headstart Ruby book. Ruby seems super easy to learn compared to other languages, compared to Java and Javascript anyway.

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Jonas Funcke • Edited

OK so you need the following things:

  • A Computer
  • Mustard
  • A paperclip

And (I can't stress this enough)

  • A life-size cutout of a capybara

Jk...
I used rubymonk.com/
And can really recommend: "effective testing with rspec 3" (p.s. it also got some nice stuff about Sinatra - API DSL - :D)
And of course follow the ruby tag on here :D

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Ngari Ndung'u

I got my start with the ruby koans. Was great for quickly picking up syntax and served as my intro to TDD.

Once you reach enlightenment the files also serve as a good quick reference.

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Ben Lovy Author

Excellent, thanks so much!

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Francel

Hello, I am also a Ruby developer and I am in Africa, I would like to learn more about Ruby and Ruby on rails and become better, that's why I would like to ask you if you can give me your lessons. from ruby ​​or ruby ​​on rails from udemy or whatever.
thank you so much

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Ben Lovy Author

I'm currently just using the official documentation! Good luck :)

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Michael Kohl • Edited

For me, it basically went like this:

  1. Official docs
  2. Poignant guide
  3. Some good books
  4. Become a mentor at RubyLearning (nothing teaches you better than teaching others)
  5. Reading the C source code of Ruby (it's really quite approachable and the definitive answer to any question you may have)

Step 1 was in 2004, step 5 started in 2009.

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Swastik Baranwal

If you want to understand OOP then C++ is for you and Ruby is easy. Get some books and references and try out some code in REPL.

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Ben Lovy Author • Edited

It's more Ruby specifically than OOP I want to understand, but I get the impression the two are closely intertwined, more so than with C++.

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Swastik Baranwal

If you have tried dynamic and scripting languages then this will be easy for you. I have learned languages of different category.

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Antonio Djigo

I learned with Michael Hartl's Rails Tutorial last year, can't complain!

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Ben Lovy Author

Hah - good answer:

bluth

If only!

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Jason C. McDonald

Career Development Through Strategic Ignorance™

Well...that's one way of doing it!

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Erik W

Sandi's book is one the best. There's another good one called Mastering Ruby Closures by Benjamin Tan Wei Hao. Good luck!

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Ben Lovy Author

Awesome, thanks for the link. I already bought POODR and have to say it's already one of the best books on software I've read to date, having only completed the first two chapters. Wide-ranging wisdom that far exceeds just Ruby.

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Ben Lovy Author

This looks really cool, might have to buy this too. Thank you.

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Tim Downey

Michael Hartl's Rails tutorial is how I learned it in 2013.

I think you'll be fine.