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Nočnica Fee for Heroku

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What do you call your folder where you keep your code?

On each new PC I make a folder named after some version of the afterlife: 'xibalba,' 'elysium,' 'outerdark.' And that's where I keep all my code. I assume everyone does this? And I'm curious where you keep your code on your own PC.

Top comments (57)

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c_v_ya profile image
Constantine

That's interesting 😄

Mine is simple ~/projects for all my.. well, projects. And inside are dirs by technology for personal stuff, e.g. python/, react/, etc. And %company_name%/ for full-time job projects.

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nirlanka profile image
Nir Lanka ニル

~/Dev
It matches other folder names in ~.

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peacefullatom profile image
Yuriy Markov

Mine is ~/repo 😁
As a second level I'm using a customer name.
Finally, a project name.
Something like this pattern:
~/repo/customer/project

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thecodepixi profile image
Emmy | Pixi

I'm boring/lazy. Mines literally just "Code" and it's a top level directory so I can just cd code and find what I need haha

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chakrihacker profile image
Subramanya Chakravarthy

Me too

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din0s profile image
dinos

Same here!

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nocnica profile image
Nočnica Fee Author

This makes more sense than the people calling it “github”

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thecodepixi profile image
Emmy | Pixi

Is that a thing people do!?

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nocnica profile image
Nočnica Fee Author

on here and on Twitter it is, I think, the most common answer

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cmanique profile image
Carlos Manique Silva • Edited on

I use variants of ~/_git/repo_domain/repo_group/repo_name depending on the hosting.
Allows me to quickly browse stuff that is either local, github, gitlab, etc...

Anything related to software tools I keep in ~/work/tools, organised in concept, vendor, tool, version (ie: ide/jetbrains/intellij/20201).

Project related stuff like documents, assets I keep in variants of ~/work/projects/customer_name/initiative/project

Many people place code together with projects, but having separate folders is useful to avoid long paths, and I get a clear ideia of what's transient and versioned or not.

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ashkanmohammadi profile image
Amohammadi2

Nice 👍

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ekafyi profile image
Eka

I'm a bit obsessive-compulsive when it comes to organizing my files (either it has be consistent OR I'd leave it completely messy). After trying complex structures, now under the default Mac OS Documents, I just have:

  • _Work --> has subdirectories for Day Job and each paid side project
  • Foo --> all non-paid/personal coding projects go here
  • Bar
  • Baz

Last two directories will be for non-code personal projects but currently they are empty. I recently changed laptop (~3 months ago); my old projects are in my external HDD.

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alaindet profile image
Alain D'Ettorre
.
|---dev
    |---projects
        |---my-cool-website
        |---a-fun-side-project
        |---my-company-stuff
    |---learn
        |---react
        |---angular
        |---whatever-youre-learning
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jakesweb profile image
Jacob Colborn

I keep all my projects in ~/code/, breaking down each project into its own directory. I don't have my first customer yet, but when I do I'll have a directory in the code directory called customers and store that data in each customers own directory.

I save creative names for my hostnames. Each host in my network is named after a Norse god.

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itsasine profile image
ItsASine (Kayla)

Echoing love for ~/dev. It's short enough that it's easy to get to my files, though I am liking some of the organizing in this thread. ~/dev is a mix of Github, GitLab, and local on my Mac which is a tad unwieldy, especially when most of those haven't been touched in ages. My current Chromebook's ~/dev at least is pretty clean since it's new.

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leonlafa profile image
Leon Lafayette

Be prepared to be underwhelmed.

I name my folder... dev/ 😀

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jsn1nj4 profile image
Elliot Derhay

On my work laptop, it's on a secondary storage drive. So it's like this:

Z:\projects\<project-name>

Of course I'm on Windows and need them accessible via stuff like FileZilla and Explorer, otherwise I'd probably have them all in WSL directly. 🤷‍♂️

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phortx profile image
Benjamin Klein

workspaces

Then I have a workspace for the projects of my job (i22), one for hobby projects (personal), one for experiments (lab) and one when cloning foreign open source projects (external).

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christianguevara profile image
Christian Guevara • Edited on

I call it Developer, so I get a nice icon :) Developer folder

The internal structure is:

~/Developer/%company%/%project%/

If the project is not part of a company or just for fun, it goes directly to ~/Developer root.

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nikoheikkila profile image
Niko Heikkilä

Mine follows this pattern:

~/src/<gitserver>/<owner>/<repository>

Example:

~/src/github.com/nikoheikkila/cv

Mostly I use z to jump to correct directory by repo name which is neatly supported by this.

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rohitshetty profile image
Rohit Shetty

I have a ~/dev where all my projects reside.
Inside I've subfolders for work and personal projects. Work is further divided into client-name folders.

The client-name folder is the home for that particular client and all their projects reside here.

I've resources and notes inside each client-name. resources contains well, any resources (AWS/Azure stuff, any documentation, or any resources) and notes contains timestamped txt file with my thoughts working on the project at the moment. It helps me visit back and see my thoughts few days down the feature/task. I use VSCode project manager so switching between projects/ clients is easy too.

Take a look at this:

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