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Cover image for Combining Music and Code with Amirreza Amouie and Jérémie Astor
The DEV Team

Combining Music and Code with Amirreza Amouie and Jérémie Astor

ben profile image Ben Halpern ・2 min read

As we'll discover in S4E4 of DevDiscuss, putting music and code together can be very generative

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This week's episode of the DevDiscus podcast was a particularly fun one for @jess and me to record. In it, we had the pleasure of chatting with Amirreza Amouie, aka Amu, indie artist and software engineer, and Jérémie Astor, creator of Gwion, a programming language aimed at making music. The conversation you'll hear is focused on the software side of music-making, how code and music intersected in the lives of our guests, and much more. We’ll also hear clips of some of the music our guests have made!

If you’ve ever been fascinated by the effect music has on your ability to focus or code in a more enjoyable way, I think this episode will strike a chord with you.


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Acknowledgements

  • @levisharpe for producing & mixing the show
  • Our season four sponsors: DataStax, New Relic, Educative, and Ambassador Labs!

🗣️🗣️🗣️

Discussion (2)

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femolacaster profile image
femolacaster

Beautiful. Generative music could actually be good music. In actual fact, the use of DAWs and some DAW element such as piano roll, sequencer(s) etc. without changing the velocity already limits human intervention. Well, the issue of copyright in relation to the size of neural network is a great concern. Nice one guys! I believe generative music could be a dream come true starting with specialised genres then moving on to more generic genres and fusions. In Africa, there is an instrument popularly used in the Yoruba culture. Pretty much tuned to have only 3 notes because everything in Yoruba langugage can be said using 3 attonations. Such talking drum music can easily be switched to a generative. So, we start small. We KISS and see how far we go.

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George Francis

Ooooh! 👀